If You Have To Do “Black Friday,” We’ve Got A Better Way

A “Buy This, Not That” article.

 

Some words and phrases lose their meaning over time. Sometimes that’s through actual physical repetition—try saying the word “surreptitiously” 20 times and see if it still sounds like English at the end. Other times it is because the word themselves become less precise, or stop meaning what they used to mean. Words like “metrosexual” or “mansplain” lost their meaning over time because they were being used to describe things that didn’t fit, or because people misused them, or just because people are weird. I feel like “Black Friday” has joined that category.

Black Friday used to mean three things:

  1. Getting up at 4 AM the day after Thanksgiving to shop for cheap things that you really want.
  2. A singular day of sales.
  3. Newscasters showing footage of seething masses of frantic humans losing their goddamn minds in a Target.

And now it means… not those things. Well, it still means the last thing. I don’t know what newscasters would do without footage of Black Friday “riots.” They might have to actually report the news. Heaven forbid.

But the meaning of Black Friday has started to change dramatically.

The onset of e-commerce meant that we spread into Cyber Monday. Then the fear of big businesses encouraged Small Business Saturday. And then nonprofits were like “we want in on this action” and started Giving Tuesday. Then the day itself started to stretch. First it was starting at midnight on Thanksgiving. Then…. six PM on Thanksgiving? Then pretty much all of Thanksgiving. And now the sales are just basically all of November. Just this evening, I got an ad for a “pre-Black Friday” sale at Office Depot. Office Depot.

And the “cheap things that you really want” thing changed as well. Black Friday sales are often “sales” in the way that garage sales are “sales”: they are opportunities to get rid of shit that the owners don’t want and hope you are stupid enough to take. It’s a way to empty out stock before the heart of Christmas shopping.  And the “cheap” thing is a lie these days, too. Oftentimes the “sale” is the same price that the object already is, but with a new label on it. Last time I partook in Black Friday, I was very pleased to get a copy of Apples to Apples for $15. The next week I saw it in the store for… $10. The hell.

So all of that adds up to one thing: Black Friday is bullshit. It is extra bullshit now, because of that aforementioned time creep. Because capitalism is always gonna capitalism, low-wage workers are being forced to leave their Thanksgiving celebrations early, or miss their Thanksgiving celebrations entirely, so that people who don’t realize that the internet exists can get $5 off of a flat-screen TV. It is bullshit.

So don’t do it. Don’t go out on Black Friday. Don’t give more money to Bezos or the Waltons. Instead, if you want to spend money, buy things from smaller artisans and creators. Like the ones I’m about to show you!

Each of these artists has either made something that is hanging up in my house at this very moment, or was recommended to me by a friend. So they all are beloved by people with excellent taste. Also, all images are the copyrighted property of their creators — I’m just borrowing them temporarily to show you all how cool they are.

And heads up: their sites or shops are hyperlinked in their names.

 

Meghan Rowswell

I’m not 100% sure that there is an art style that Meghan Rowswell doesn’t do. She makes gorgeous ikebana arrangements, crazy cool egg decoration things, textile sculptures, and collages. She honestly does more than that, but if I keep listing her accomplishments, I’m going to start feeling lame about my lack thereof. So instead I’ll just show you one of my favorite pieces, a collage she did. Her site doesn’t have anything currently on sale, but I have it on good authority that if you e-mail her you can totally work out a commission. (This “good authority” comes from having, you know, done that.)

 

The Latest Kate

The Latest Kate is an artist who makes really adorable posters of animals with encouraging sayings on them. LOOK AT THIS MAJESTIC SPACE DEER. The space deer is reminding you that you’re a badass. Thank you, space deer. I am, in fact, a badass.

 

 

CarnivalSix

I need to have about sixteen more children in my life than I do, because I need to buy all of them these adorable fairytale prints from CarnivalSix. They’re all really cute interpretations of classic stories, with key quotes from the story featured as part of the story. The genius behind CarnivalSix, Laurel Shelley-Reuss, is also the co-creator of a fantastic RPG-based comic called The Handbook of Heroes. It also has a Patreon. (Hint, hint.)

 

Emily McDowell

Emily McDowell creates a variety of products, including cards, mugs, and stationary. My favorites are her cards, which are quite outside your average Hallmark, in that they admit that sympathy cards are a fruitless attempt to make people feel better when they can’t be made to feel better. Or give genuine congratulations for a new baby.

 

 

Tea and Absinthe

Tea and Absinthe makes tea, teaware, and other drinkware. It’s all pretty fantastic, but my favorite is this dapper octopus mixer. He has a hat.

 

Kevin Eslinger

Kevin Eslinger makes original art as well as fanart. Because I’m a geek, I’m especially fond of the fanart, especially his splatter-style of fanart. Like this amazing splatter Venom, which seems to really capture all of the messy “WTF-ness” of Venom.

 

Karen Hallion

Hi, my name is Elle, and I’m an addict. It’s been… well like one month since I bought a Karen Hallion piece. I have a problem. Karen Hallion is at the perfect intersection for me of fanart, feminism, art nouveau, and general fun. I have So Many Karen Hallion prints. Like, All. All the Prints. It’s a problem. I’m running out of wall. But one that I definitely have is this one, because it is AMAZING. It is art noveau Spider-Gwen. ART NOVEAU SPIDER-GWEN.

 

Flying Frog Illustration

Flying Frog Illustration does really gorgeous watercolors, both originals and fanart. I have a few of their pieces, but my absolute favorite has to be this piece of the Endless from Neil Gaiman’s Sandman. I’m already a sucker for these characters, especially all together like this, but what I’m blown away by is the color and complexity. Most fanart I’ve seen of the Endless tends towards the minimalist, and this is anything but. This is the Endless as seen by Delirium, and I love it.

 

Megan Lara

So the art nouveau thing… it’s happening again. Megan Lara has great original art and fanart, but the pieces that I collect the most are her art nouveau depictions of badass female characters. It is really hard to choose a favorite—Peggy Carter, Princess Leia, and Wonder Woman all hang in their art nouveau glory on my wall. But the centerpiece of my collection has to be this amazing depiction of Shuri. The colors and the details are just so epic, and Shuri herself is so fantastic.

 

C Wilson Art

C Wilson Art specializes in fanart combined with classic styles, like amazing military portraits of Star Wars characters. My absolute favorite, however, has to be this “Creation of Adam” parody starring Cthulhu and the Flying Spaghetti Monster. I love it so, so much. So much.

 

 

Leanne Huynh

Leanne Huynh does a lot of amazing original art as well as fanart, and it’s really hard to pick a favorite. But I will probably have to go with this piece of a baby Eeyore, because it is basically the only thing in the world that can make my ovaries clench like I want a child. I don’t actually want a child, I just want to give a child this adorable picture of baby Eeyore. It is that cute.

 

 

MJ Erickson

MJ Erickson does fanart, original art, and also makes pins. Most of the pieces that I actually own aren’t currently up on her site, but I dug through the interwebs to find my favorite, this print of Valkyrie raining down holy hell. Look at this piece. Look closelier. Look more closelier. It’s freaking amazing. And even cooler, Valkyrie herself, Tessa Thompson, saw the pic and gave it her seal of approval.

 

Atomic Pixies

I mentioned that I like art nouveau, right? Well guess what, here is more! Atomic Pixies does really cute art nouveau pop culture pieces. They have an entire series of RuPaul’s Drag Race contestants in art nouveau style and with one of their famous catchphrases. I wanna collect them all, like Pokémon cards.

 

Chrissie Zullo

Chrissie Zullo also does both original art and fanart (sensing another trend?) She has lots of way cool pieces, but the one that I have hanging up in my kitchen is the best, in my opinion—a coffin-shaped pic of a vampire bobby soxer at a death-themed soda fountain. Like, how do you even come up with that? And look at how adorable she is, drinking that refreshing bottle of blood! She has the bat equivalent of a poodle skirt! What’s not to love?

 

Twilight Garden Shop

Twilight Garden Shop makes artisan bath products that look very scrumptious. Literally. Like I would totally be tempted to eat this soap. It’s like what happens when a geode and taffy have a baby.

 

Sweet Pickles’ Designs

Sweet Pickles’ Designs makes pet accessories that are just too adorable. Like this adorable spooky pet bow tie.

 

That’s just a sampling of my very favorites. I encourage you all to show them love (and by love, I mean both praise them and give them money). But there are also literally thousands and millions more artists out there who could use your support and admiration. And you can give it to them without even fully waking from your turkey coma, without making some poor person making $8.00 an hour venture into the cold to get screamed at by someone who has officially spent way too much time with their family and has to take it out on someone, and without making any mega billionaires any more ridiculously wealthy. So win-win, right?

Signed: Feminist Fury

***

Featured image shows a storefront from the inside with two naked mannequins looking out. The glass has “50% off” posters stuck to it. It was taken by Kecko and is released under a CC-BY-2.0 license.

Midterm Recap: It Was A Good Night

Because we have to celebrate every victory.

 

So there will definitely be time in the upcoming weeks to dissect the parts of the last election that didn’t go the way that we wanted them to. There will be a lot of time to address and be angry about voter suppression, and races where Republicans ran unopposed, and the fact that Steve King is still a powerful Iowa Nazi. But for just a brief moment, I want to acknowledge the good things that happened.

1. We took the House. We took the goddamn House. Maxine Waters is now going to be a committee chairwoman.

2. A record number of women are going to Congress.

3. Of that record-setting number, we got a lot of firsts and bests. Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland will be the first Native American Women in Congress (Davids is a member of the Ho-Chunk nation and Haaland is Laguna Pueblo). Davids is also openly gay and has some guns that put Van Damme to shame. More like Van Daaaamn. (I only partially regret that.) Ayanna Pressley, from my temporary home in Boston, will be the first Black woman to represent Massachusetts, while Rachael Rollins will be the first Black DA for Suffolk County (aka the county that Boston is in). Jahana Hayes will be the first Black woman to represent Connecticut. Rashida Tlaib and Ihan Omar will be the first Muslim women in Congress. Cindy Axne and Abby Finkenauer will be the first women to represent Iowa in the House, and Finkenauer will share the honor of youngest women ever elected to Congress with the Latinx badass Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Ocasio-Cortez will continue to rep millennials everywhere by sharing the name of the awesome red lipstick she wears (“Beso” by Stila, which is also the color I wear, which makes me feel cool by proxy) and by not really having the money to live in DC despite having just won a Congressional race. Janet Mills will be the first female governor of Maine. (My own state’s Mary Throne unfortunately lost her attempt to be Wyoming’s second ever female governor.)

4. Jared Polis because the first openly gay governor.

5. There are now a record number of Black Lieutenant Governors. (I admittedly don’t totally know what Lieutenant Governors do. Wyoming doesn’t have those.)

6. Massachusetts protected rights for trans citizens.

7. Multiple states took action against gerrymandering.

8. Colorado fully outlawed slavery. Yes it’s 2018, yes it only passed with 65% of the vote, but maybe you didn’t know that slavery is still legal in many parts of America as a punishment and prison labour is a billion-dollar industry.

9. Florida restored voter rights to roughly 1.4 million former felons. This is insanely huge, metaphorically and literally—that is almost three times the population of Wyoming. That includes nearly 400,000 Black citizens (again, almost the population of Wyoming).

10. Voter turnout for the midterms was at 49%, which hasn’t happened since the 1960s.

Like I said, later I’ll let myself be depressed by the bad stuff, and start stoking my anger for the things I need to be angry about. But for tonight, for maybe a whole week, I’m going to let myself be happy about what we accomplished.

Signed: Feminist Fury

***

Featured image is of an “I Voted Today” sticker. It’s by Steve Rainwater and is released under a CC-BY-SA 2.0 License.

Ellements of Film: The Last Jedi

Yes, it’s been almost a year. That’s why this is going to be very. very. thorough.

 

Buckle up, kids, this one is going to be a doozy. I’ve been formulating parts of this in my mind for the better part of a year. It’s big enough that it comes in parts. So if you don’t want to wade through the entirety of my word vomit, here is the table of contents. Feel free to skip around and look for certain sections if something strikes your fancy.

Part 1: Confessions and Acknowledgements

Part 2: My Overarching Theory

Part 3: Not-So-Liveblog

Part 4: The Not-So-Good

Part 5: The Freaking Great

Part 6: The Defense

Part 7: The Summation

***

Part 1: Confessions and Acknowledgements

Confession/Acknowledgment 1: The closest that my boyfriend and I have ever come to an honest-to-god, raised voices fight, happened during our attempt to discuss this movie. We were having dinner at a steakhouse and went (almost without me noticing) from calmly discussing our opinions to raising our voices. I decided that we should stop talking about the movie for the sake of peace, and since then this film has been a touchy-to-nonexistent topic between us. We’ve found as much middle ground as we’re going to, which honestly is not a lot. For me, this is one of my favorite Star Wars films. For him, it is the absolute worst Star Wars film, and possibly the worst film ever made. At least part of my delay in addressing this film comes from not wanting to restart an old argument. But what am I, if not self-destructive?

Confession/Acknowledgment 2: I have spent the better part of a year reading thinkpieces, watching YouTube videos, and generally engrossing myself in discussions on this film. In my infinite wisdom, I made absolutely no attempts to bookmark or otherwise keep track of what I’ve read, and at this point the thought of trying to backtrack and rediscover most of that content makes me dizzy and feel like I suddenly need to do absolutely anything else. So for the sake of actually finishing this damn thing, this isn’t going to be as meticulously sourced as say my epically long response to Wonder Woman. I will probably commit the sins of coming up with an idea that someone else has already come up with, using the vague phrase “I read somewhere,” and possibly even using someone’s theory without attribution, all of which I apologize for in advance. I do know and remember that I read many excellent pieces by the writers of The Mary Sue¸ and was in very close agreement with this video from the Pop Culture Detective on YouTube.

Confession/Acknowledgement 3: I do understand that there are sustained and legitimate criticisms against The Last Jedi. I don’t think anyone is automatically a bad person just for disliking the movie. I don’t think that all criticisms of the film can be reduced to simply misogyny or racism. However, I think that a lot of the criticisms against it come down to misogyny or racism, and I think that it is important for those who have other criticisms of the film to look around at the company they are keeping.  If two different people are saying the film “ruined their childhood,” it is pretty hard, if not impossible, to discern the difference between the person who is saying that because they have legitimate critiques of the film versus the person whose fragile sense of masculinity was destroyed. And I think it is important for even the people who have legitimate critiques to examine the sources of some of their feelings and determine whether any of their feelings stem from some of the same sources of toxic masculinity as some of the overt trolls.

(At this point I’ve probably successfully alienated most of my readers, including potentially my own partner. So, let’s get to it.)

 

Part 2: My Overarching Theory

I believe that I understand at least part of the fundamental reason that this film is so polarizing. (So polarizing, in fact, that Russian bots used it to sew dissent in much the same way they used Facebook pages about political groups..) In something that I think is both the work of a mad genius and a hatefuck towards the fandom, The Last Jedi is, in many ways, an attempt to modernize the series by not only refuting much of the memberberries-infused nostalgia of the JJ Abrams film, but also some of the elements of the original trilogy and the George Lucas-directed prequels. Many fans, especially male fans, were upset that this film did not resemble “their” Star Wars. And to a certain extent, they are right. This is not “their” Star Wars: It’s “mine.” This film deliberately de-privileges white, heteronormative, macho-influenced narratives that were the bread and butter of most of the main Star Wars films, as well as (to my understanding) a vast portion of the Expanded Universe/Legends/Whatever You Want to Call the Older Non-Movie Stuff. It’s entirely possible that large groups of people who have built a lot of their identities on the basis of the original style would suddenly not see themselves represented in this new film, and that can be pretty scary. It’s also one of the major reasons I love this film.

 

Part 3: Not-So-Liveblog

The format that most of my liveblog reviews are in is a stream-of-consciousness during my first viewing. My first viewing of this film was almost a year ago, so that ship has obviously sailed. But I’ve been deliberately waiting to re-watch the film until I could work on this post, so we get a not-so-live version of the liveblog that is still pretty fresh, in that it catches my reactions to my second-ever viewing.

  • Hells yes more Billie Lourd.
  • Domhnall Gleeson needs to get better sleep.
  • I don’t entirely get the humor stuff at the beginning. I also don’t know why they didn’t open fire from the beginning. Like, aren’t these the merciless bad guys?
  • Why are the cannons so bad at cannoning?
  • Why didn’t they scramble fighters already?
  • Okay, so hanging up on General Leia is like hanging up on Michelle Obama if she is also a five star general. YOU DO NOT DO THAT. That is insubordination. There are military crime words for that.
  • Ooh, token inclusions of women and black fighter pilots. We have more diversity in the first five minutes of this film than most of the original Star Wars.
  • Okay, so when my grandpa fought in World War II, his job was to be on bomber planes and literally kick bombs that got stuck so they would drop. Are you telling me that is still how you do it on spaceships?
  • Why is there only one remote for “drop all the super important bombs.” Why isn’t that remote on a bungee or something?
  • Okay there are only so many times that the scene of Paige dying is allowed to make me cry. So far that number of times is two.
  • God this scene of everyone celebrating while Leia is looking at the death toll is so, so perfect. So much of Star Wars is about giant explosion and destruction sequences where no one really thinks about the human cost.
  • Again, not getting the comic relief shit. Like, I know Snoke is mad at Hux. But is it really the best idea to make him look like a dumbass in front of all of his troops?
  • I love that they basically put Finn in the storage room, and apparently have no one paying attention to the coma patient.
  • I will admit that I laughed out loud the first time I saw Luke chuck the lightsaber. It’s a moment that looks like it is going to be infused with so much significance, and then nooooope.
  • I know everyone hates on the Porgs, but after I saw the first movie I found out that the reason they exist is that there were already way too many puffins on the island and no one could make them go away, so they just CGI’d over them as Porgs, and that makes me so, so happy.
  • Okay, so Luke should probably have had a better emotional reaction to learning about Han and seeing Chewie.
  • This may just be the fanfiction talking, but I remain convinced that Hux and Kylo Ren want to hatefuck each other very, very badly.
  • Snoke is so disappointing. Like, I didn’t expect him to actually be giant like he is in his hologram, but he looks like a wax figure of Hugh Hefner melted and then got put in a new smoking jacket. All of his guards look way cooler than him.
  • Dude who are you calling a cur? Hux is evil and not good, but Kylo Ren throws LITERAL TEMPER TANTRUMS WHERE HE DESTROYS EQUIPMENT AND RUINS PLANS.
  • Is Snoke just… negging everyone? Is that his plan?
  • Okay I’m with Snoke on the mask thing.
  • Did he repair his scar with like… snake skin? Or tire rubber?
  • “What you think I’m gonna walk out with a laser sword and face down the whole First Order?” ….yep, that seems to have been exactly her thought.
  • To be fair, if there is one thing I’ve learned from all of the movies and all of the video games, it’s that the Jedi Order totally shits the bed about once every 50 to 1000 years and is constantly on the brink of collapse. So Luke is probably right about the galaxy not needing the Jedi Order.
  • ….this milking scene is entirely unnecessary and I don’t like it. I say that as someone who grew up on a ranch and literally has seen cows being milked.
  • I can’t help but think that this version of Luke got at least a bit of the Mark Hamill Joker humor.
  • “Get your head out of your cockpit” is my new favorite thing.
  • “There are things you cannot solve by jumping in an X-wing and blowing something up.” Yaaas Leia tell him.
  • “Dead heroes. No leaders.”
  • Damnit I was just starting to like that token female pilot.
  • Okay, on the one hand, I am A, really glad that Leia did not go out like a chump like this, B, glad to have proof of my longstanding belief that Leia is a badass Force user in her own right, and C, glad to see space being made for Force users that are not Jedi. But on the other hand, holy shit this is a stupid looking scene to have Leia Excelssior-ing back to the ship.
  • RIP Admiral Ackbar
  • Ooooh low blow R2. Well done.
  • What are you straightening up for Dameron, you ain’t coming to leadership.
  • God, 400. I forgot how few people there were left.
  • I really love Admiral Holdo’s character design and I will throw down over this.
  • “We are the spark that will light the fire that will restore the Republic.” How many sparks are there going to be, exactly?
  • “That’s Admiral Holdo?” But she’s so… girl-shaped and mauve. Yeah I know what you’re doing Poe, I see you.
  • “Very kind of you to make me aware.” Admiral Holdo is Every Woman Who Has Ever Been Mansplained to right now.
  • “Not commander, right?” Holdo knows how to play boy brain ball.
  • “Of course you do.”
  • “You’re impulsive, dangerous, and the last thing we need right now.”
  • So I will admit it isn’t super sensical for Holdo to just refuse to share her plan. But I also contend that people would be at least 60% more okay with it if she weren’t a woman with purple pink hair.
  • I know that Finn gets a lot of flack for this move, but I think it is genuinely a good aspect of character continuity. He is a formerly nameless member of a cannon fodder class who was only a hero because there were specific people he was caring about who were in the fight. It absolutely makes sense for him to not want to fight more, and for him to find those specific friends again. He’s not just a random dude, he is a dude with a shit ton of PTSD.
  • “Doing talking” I love you Rose. Rose is every awkward girl ever.
  • Do not talk over Rose, Finn. That is rude.
  • Okay Threepio, go tell on Poe. Right now. Do it.
  • “Exactly one guy I trust.” Exactly. One. Guy.
  • I am Not a Fan of the Kylo/Rey scenes. I am not a fan of the way that they are trying to get us to empathize with Kylo, full stop.
  • I really need some frog nun backstory.
  • “Impressive. Every word in that sentence was wrong.” Things I Wish I Could Have Said When I was Teaching.
  • “That Force does not belong to the Jedi. To say that if the Jedi die, the light dies is vanity.” All of this
  • Again, can admit why it’s weird that Luke would close himself off. But I also kinda think it makes sense.
  • Okay but this raw Force scaring you is how we got in trouble in the first place. If you hadn’t gotten all scared and tried to KILL YOUR NEPHEW he possibly wouldn’t have snapped.
  • I really love Rey’s honestly happy reaction to water. You have to remember how new all of this shit is to her. She’s been living in a totally dry desert planet for years and would probably have never seen vast quantities of water.
  • See, Kylo is very self aware that he is a monster.
  • “Filled with the worst people in the galaxy.” The 1%
  • Parking Porssdhet is getting black folks in trouble for no real reason.
  • Fucking love the worldbuilding in this scene. Also, how do they manage to make everyone dress in a color scheme? Does this casino have a dress code? Is it like Diddy’s White Party?
  • Also kinda love the drunk gremlin trying to play slots on BB8.
  • Cruelty towards animals and children, because quick pathos.
  • “There’s only one business in the galaxy that will get you this rich.” “War.”
  • Dreadful waste of Justin Theroux.
  • “And then two busy parents sent their son to boarding school in his most virulent teenage period, and then we were all very, very surprised when he turned evil.”
  • And this is why we can’t redeem Kylo too much, because he legit went all school shooter.
  • WHY WOULD YOU TRUST THIS MAN? I know we aren’t supposed to judge books by their cover, but there is literally no reason to trust this man. If he could have let himself out at any time, why in God’s name didn’t he?
  • With the exception of showing off the kids and how cool the Fathiers look, this scene is entirely unnecessary and just extra padding.
  • Okay just saying, they are gonna recatch those fox horses in about five seconds.
  • I do not find Kylo’s high rise pants as mockable as most of the internet does.
  • I really like how they manage to do two very different POVs of the same scene.
  • “Let the past die. Kill it, if you have to. That’s the only way to become what you’re meant to be.” Let’s put a pin in that for now.
  • I admit that I do not totally understand the multiple Rey scene.
  • I have mixed feelings about the hand touching scene. Putting a pin in that one, too
  • Fucking love the Yoda scene.
  • “I am gonna throw a tantrum!” “Bitch, please.”
  • “Page turners, they were not.” I’m not the only one who’s tried to actually read multiple religious texts and given up.
  • “That library contains nothing that the girl Rey does not already possess.” Ha
  • “Failure most of all. The greatest teacher, failure is.”
  • “We are what they grow beyond. That is the true burden of all masters.” LET THE PAST DIE, LUKE
  • That tree is on purpose burning in the shape of the rebellion symbol, right?
  • This scene on the ship is the only reason to have DJ in this movie.
  • “Made his bank selling weapons to the bad guys. And the good.” MORALITY IS NOT ALL BLACK AND WHITE FINN
  • “Finn let me learn you something big. It is all a machine, partner.” DJ is smart sometimes.
  • I would have paid large sums of money for him to say “Live free die hard.”
  • Maybe don’t put the ship on speakerphone in front of the criminal you found in jail when people are discussing resistance plans.
  • I will admit one of the few spots where I acknowledge that Rey has a touch of the Mary Sue is that she can understand both droid and Wookie.
  • Okay, again Holdo is probably not doing something logical, but THIS IS STILL TREASON, POE.
  • That’s right Leia you shoot that man.
  • Okay DO NOT JUST TALK ABOUT WHAT A SCAMP HE IS, HE COMMITTED TREASON MEN NEED TO BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS.
  • SEE POE THERE WAS A PLAN.
  • I was so, so hoping that this was a chance for Phasma to finally be a badass. I was so, so disappointed.
  • THIS IS WHY YOU DON’T TRUST RANDOM DUDES YOU MET IN PRISON
  • Coolest fight seen. Possibly coolest scene in the movie.
  • Okay I know that this is traumatic for Rey, but I really, really love that her parents were nobodies. Put a pin in this too, we’ll get back to this later.
  • I love BB8 as much as the next girl, but even I can acknowledge this scene is kinda hella dumb.
  • #Justice4Phasma
  • I want a crystal fox now
  • THIS SCENE IS SO PRETTY
  • Sure now Poe understands suicide runs. He also now knows how Leia feels all. The. Time.
  • This romance between Rose and Finn came out of nowhere and I do not accept it. Finn+Poe 4Eva. Also possible Finn+Poe+Rey, because the way you solve potential love triangles is with a threesome
  • “Not by fighting what we hate. Saving what we love.” Okay this is an objectively dumb statement.
  • So he’s… gonna go out there with a laser sword and face down the whole First Order?
  • Hux is like “the fuck kind of person I’m following?”
  • The dust brushing off thing is an objectively boss move.
  • Kylo has to indulge his man pain and ego.
  • The ship driver is like “same shit, different day…”
  • “Did you come back to say you forgive me? To save my soul?” “No.”  (Put a pin in this, too.)
  • Conveniently one (1) crystal fox left to show the way
  • Okay so I know this ending for Luke is disappointing for some people but I love it and I will explain why later (remember to talk about the sun)
  • Hux is like “I cannot believe that I have to listen to this useless egomaniac just cuz he can force choke me.”
  • THERE SHE HUGGED HIM ARE YOU ALL HAPPY NOW?
  • Yeah a threesome is happening
  • Hahaha. Books.
  • “It wasn’t sadness or pain. It was peace, or purpose.”
  • Heck yeah Force kid with broom

 

Part 4: The Not-So-Good

So I think it is both important and fair to acknowledge the things that I think the film didn’t do well. When I’m defending it, I am in no way saying it is a perfect film. And there are some things that are important to call out.

Flaw One: I Have a Secret and I’m Not Telling

It is legitimately nonsensical that Holdo doesn’t tell anyone her plan. Like, straight-up. There have already been multiple attempts at desertion that were only stopped by a mechanic with a stun gun. As far as everyone knows, they’re literally just running until they run out of fuel and die. In-character, Holdo has no real reason to do what she does. As viewers, we know by the end of the film that she basically did this for plot necessity reasons. Poe had to learn his lesson and learn to trust Holdo/women. And that is a good lesson. But there had to be a better way to impart it than, “As far as you know we’re on the Titanic and I’m steering for the icebergs, don’t question me.” Now, granted, I still claim that Poe’s reaction (and audience reaction) would have been less severe if Holdo was a man. We have plenty of fictional and real life examples of male leaders going “This probably won’t kill us, hold my beer” and everyone around them going “Sir, yes sir!” But it’s genuinely a bad move and a disservice to Holdo’s character.

Flaw Two: Large Portions of the Canto Bight Scene

There are parts of the Canto Bight scene that I do love. The worldbuilding it shows, the way it makes Finn and the viewer consider the rot at the heart of glamor, the way it complicates an easy black and white narrative and symbolizes that complication with its color scheme—all good things. But they get in trouble for illegal parking, and some concerned citizen literally tracks them down? The entire damn escape on giant horse foxes that ends in nothing? Yeah, this scene could have been trimmed.

Flaw Three: The Odd Couple, Only With Violence

I genuinely don’t get parts of the dynamic between Kylo Ren, Hux, and Snoke. It was all obviously fraught in the last film, but now it’s almost slapstick, and to a point that doesn’t make sense. Darth Vader would force choke someone, but he would rarely/never slide a general like a Swiffer across a deck. The whole relationship between them seemed off.

Flaw Four: Snoke. Just… Snoke

I was pretty sure even in the last film that Snoke was probably not the giant that he appeared to be in his hologram. I just was not expecting… this. I think I’ve rarely been so disappointed in a villain. He’s just… straight up not scary. He legit looks like a wax figure of Hugh Hefner that melted and then got put in a shiny smoking jacket. We learn precisely 0 about his backstory—where he comes from, what he was doing during the Empire, how he got into Kylo’s head, how he is involved with the First Order… he’s just…there. All melty.

Flaw Five: Chewbacca

Look, why are you gonna make a poor guy dress up in the suit if this is all you’re going to do with him? We learned from Solo that Chewbacca can hold his own as a co-star. There should have been at least some better scenes between him and Luke, and not just him and… porgs.

Flaw Six: Poor Goddamn Phasma

When I first learned about the Captain Phasma character, I was so. Goddamn. Excited. The actress playing her is a badass, her character design is awesome, it would be great to have a compelling female villain…. And then the first movie totally failed her. So when I found out she was going to be in this film, I got excited again. Surely this director would see the shameful way Phasma was treated in the last film and rectify it, right? ….No. No they would not. They took one of the coolest character designs in ages, and totally wasted it.

Flaw Seven: The Assassination of the Character of Poe Dameron by the Coward Narrative Convenience

I really liked Poe in the first film. He was cocky and everything, sure. But he was also warmhearted, and humorous, and brave. And in this film we get to see about… 20% of those good characteristics.

Again, Poe Learning a Lesson is an important plot point in the film, and there are aspects of that plot that I really enjoy because of the way it tackles toxic masculinity (more on that later.) But I feel like Poe was an unfortunate victim of the need to tell that story, primarily because he was the prominent male pilot we had at hand. I like the story that is told with him, but not necessarily that it is told with him, if that makes any sense. And of course, there are some troubling implications in making a character of color suddenly turn into a machismo stereotype in order to tell a story that is much more applicable to the white male characters that normally inhabit the films.

Flaw Seven Subset A: Poe Learns a Lesson Without Really Learning a Lesson

So Poe Learns a Lesson is a big part of the film, but he kind also… doesn’t learn his lesson? He committed insubordination. He held a gun on a superior officer. He endangered the lives of dozens, and while their eventual deaths were not really his “fault” (they are the fault of the people who, you know, kill them) you could probably make an argument for accessory to manslaughter. He took over an entire ship. There are military crime words for this, like… treason. At the least he’d be kicked down to the brig or demoted again. At worst, depending on the military culture he is a part of, he would be fucking executed. And instead Holdo and Leia are like “Aw, he’s such a scamp. I like him.” You get the sense that the writers and director didn’t really know how to make Poe behave badly enough for him to do the Plot Necessary Things that need to happen for his big lesson arc without completely destroying his character or putting him in a position where he would be kept away from the action at the end of the film. So even though he is personally changed by what he went through, he doesn’t really have to face any true consequences of his actions.

Flaw Eight: The Genocidal Fuckhead Just Needs a Hug

Look, I have seen the internet. I understand the woobie status that many attractive male villains have obtained. (When it comes to Loki, I am probably complicit in that woobie-fication. I’m not perfect.) For the last decade or so, we’ve made a concerted effort to make our villains more complex, and even find redeemable or empathetic aspects of them. And that’s fine, even really good and compelling sometimes. But this film goes out of its way to make us want to cuddle all of Kylo Ren’s problems away, to a point that I find nearly dangerous. (I had a similar feeling about the recent season of Handmaid’s Tale and its redemption arc for Serena Joy.) Yes, Kylo Ren has had hard aspects of his life, and a fellow genocidal fuckhead in his brain. I can’t imagine how terrifying it would be to wake up to your uncle trying to kill you. But I also can’t imagine how the reasonable next step is “slaughter a lot of your classmates.” And I certainly can’t imagine how the logical response to that is “well he’s still uncertain, he could get better!” I’ll talk more about this aspect a little bit later, but it was certainly troubling.

Flaw Nine: The Romance Between Rose and Finn

I’m already somewhat troubled by the relationship between Rose and Finn, because in certain parts of the film, Rose is very firmly slotted into the “magic character arc motivator” slot for Finn, where her basic role is to exist and make him a better person. But she gets enough moments of agency and moments that focus on her that I can overlook that. But this romance comes out of… literally nowhere. The most she has shown for Finn is hero worship, and the most he has shown for her is wary acceptance that she is right. They have known each other for (I think) less than 24 hours. So the kiss at the end is just…weird.

(Plus, you know…. Poe+Finn+Rey 4Eva)

 

Part Five: The Freaking Great

Greatness 1: Ding Dong the Toxic Masculinity is Dead

Oh my God, you guys. Oh my God. I have never, in my life, seen a mainstream film from a major action genre that does more to kick toxic masculinity in the teeth. I love it so, so much. (Fair warning, the next section is a mishmash of my own thoughts and thoughts that I have yoinked from the Pop Culture Detective.)

It’s no surprise to fans of the film series that for being a space-faring science fiction universe, it sure looks a whooooole lot like a Western, for all the good and bad that comes along with that genre. And with that genre comes a whole heaping load of toxic masculinity, to a degree that has been largely unexamined in other films in the series.

Here we have The Older Hero Who Has Turned His Back on the World (Luke), The Cocky Hero (Poe), TheCoward Who Must Be Redeemed (Finn), The Belated Addition to the Gang Who Proves His Worth (DJ), The Troubled Baddie Who Was Formerly a Goodie (Kylo Ren) The Greedy Prospector (Hux), and The Evil Gang Leader (Snoke). For the ladies we have The Spunky Love Interest (Rose), The Spunky Girl Who Wants to Do Guy Things (Rey) The Mother Figure Who Doesn’t Want Her Son to Take His Guns to Town (Leia), and then Admiral Holdo is somewhat awkwardly slotted into the role of The Ineffective Government Official Who Can’t Stand Up to the Baddies.

And in most other Star Wars films, these roles would have been fully pulled off, as written, and all of the other tropes that go along with those roles would have happened. Luke would have hemmed and hawed, but would have pretty quickly rejoined Rey and the Resistance. Poe would be celebrated for his daring and courage, Finn would come to his senses on his own (Goodnight Robicheaux, anyone?) and the plan he and Poe cooked up would have totally worked, and DJ would have come through for them because meeting people in prison and adding them to your gang is never a bad plan in a Western. Kylo Ren would probably have been brought around to the good side again (or at least killed after sacrificing himself for the greater good, or just straight up killed as punishment for turning bad) and Snoke and Hux would have gotten their comeuppance. Rey would have done cool but ultimately ineffective things because she wouldn’t want to overshadow the guys, Rose would have hung on Finn’s every word and just followed him around, Leia would have realized that she can’t control the men in her life, and Holdo would have been pushed aside because she was in the hero’s way.

And that (for the most part) doesn’t happen. Luke is legit burned out, and doesn’t change his mind about rejoining the fight until the last minute, and even then not in the predictable gung-ho way. Poe’s cockiness, temper, and certainty in his own correctness turn out terribly, and he ultimately learns that risky heroics are not always the best answer. Finn is a PTSD-stricken former child soldier who truly does need Rose’s friendship to help him look beyond his own immediate desires. The plan he and Poe made doesn’t work. DJ betrays everyone because of course he does he is a random dude you met in prison. Kylo Ren gets plenty of chances to redeem himself and then is like, “nah, I’m pretty okay with being super evil.” Snoke gets murdered, but it’s made clear that he was not the be-all, end-all of badness. Hux gets humiliated, but he’s still definitely trucking along. Rose gets to be a moral center, and even save Finn from himself in her own super heroic move. Leia and Holdo are proven right, and their authority over their male insubordinates is reestablished (And Holdo gets to go out like a goddamn bamf in a self-sacrifice that actually works, as opposed to Finn’s attempt at self-sacrifice that would have definitely not worked.) And Rey gets to have the whole hero’s journey, show both compassion and conviction, and save everyone at the end.

At pretty much every point where another film (even another Star Wars film) would have established or re-established the primacy of the male heroism narrative or sidelined a female character, this film refused to do so or even did the opposite. It took really toxic ideas about masculinity and heroism and just refused to play that shit. And I love it for that.

Greatness 2: The Diversity

This film definitely has its own problems with tokenism, but at the same time it is making major strides for racial and gender diversity. For a film series where the first trilogy had about three named female characters and two named black characters in the entire goddamn galaxy, having Rey, Leia, Holdo, Phasma, Rose, Finn, and Poe is freaking incredible. And it’s not Rian Johnson’s fault that “English brunette” became the default decision for female inclusion in the other new films.

Greatness 3: Thinking About Human Costs

One thing that I’ve noticed in action films lately is that we’re slowly making the swing from “destruction without ever thinking about the human cost” to “destruction where we do think about the human cost.” I was honestly starting to get a little bit troubled by the former, because while I don’t have any scientific evidence to back this up, I think that the scale of destruction we’re seeing in media is actually helping de-sensitize us to human tragedies in real life. How many times do you have to see cities or even planets destroyed before you lose a sense of what that destruction actually means? How many waves of enemy soldiers have to be mowed down before you stop really thinking about the fact that all of those enemy soldiers are people? Now sometimes, that “thinking about the human cost” thing is either clumsily done (Batman v. Superman) or is something that the in-movie universe can’t really afford to think about without the internal logic breaking down (introducing the Sokovia Accords reminds us that in the real world we want guns registered, so we probably would want some kind of way to track or guide people who can shoot lasers out of their eyes. And then we have to think about how we would not be on Team Cap, which is simply unacceptable).

Star Wars was getting particularly egregious at the “destruction without ever thinking about the human cost” thing. The first film destroyed Alderaan, which was shocking in the moment and seemed to have real impact, but then later in the same movie the Princess who lost her home, family, and all of her people is consoling Luke because he just lost the father figure he really liked for the week that he had known him. Each Death Star destruction comes complete with lots and lots of pilot deaths that we basically never get a chance to mourn. In The Force Awakens, the Starkiller destroys five inhabited planets, one of which was the seat of the galactic government. And we barely care. We get one scene of a lady (who apparently originally had more screen time, but it had to be cut so that we could have more scenes of Kylo Ren brooding) facing the oncoming giant laser and looking scared, and Leia looks sad when they hear the news and…. That’s it. Okay, billions of people are dead, better get back to having crazy plans and popping one-liners.

The series actually started to course correct at least a little bit with Rogue One. The Beaches of Normandy-esque scene on Scarif showed a real human cost of gaining even inches of land in a battle, and we were made to care about the loss of even pretty minor fighters. And this film pushes that even further. The scene where everyone is celebrating Poe’s “victory” and Leia is looking at the display that shows all of the lost ships is so, so perfect. Our tension and our concern keeps ratcheting up as each Resistance ship is lost on the slow run from the First Order. We’re told how insanely small the survivor population is, and then we see even more of that small population getting taken out after DJ’s betrayal. We see how bare and worn down the survivors are once they are trapped in the cave. You actually get the sense that these really are diminished, desperate people, and the human cost of each loss feels real.

Greatness 4: The Pretty

Large portions of this film are just gorgeous. The island that Luke is on, the ham-fistedly-symbolic-but-also-really-pretty casino at Canto Bight, the incredibly dynamic throne room fight, that absolutely amazing fight on Crait… so pretty. I love it.

Greatness 5: Kill the Past

So this one is tricky, because I see it as one of the best parts of the film, and it’s pretty obvious that many other fans think of it as the biggest “fuck you” to them. And… well, we’re both right. We get a little bit of what I see as author insert in a line from Kylo Ren: “Let the past die. Kill it, if you have to. That’s the only way to become what you’re meant to be.” He’s specifically speaking to Rey about her past, about the Jedi order, etc. But in my view, he’s also speaking both to the audience and to the Star Wars films themselves.

I don’t think it’s a surprise that the new trilogy is basically a swan song for the remaining cast of the first trilogy. Force Awakens was Han Solo’s chance to be cool and then die off, Last Jedi was Luke’s chance to act cool and then die off, and, God willing, the filmmakers will have enough footage of Carrie Fisher to let the ninth movie be Leia’s chance to be cool and then die off. So on a very literal level, we are killing the past by killing off the original trilogies. But it is more than that, in that (as I discussed earlier with the toxic masculinity) the film is also killing off the old ways of doing a Star Wars film.

Rian Johnson had a few obstacles to overcome, because JJ Abrams really, really likes the old way of doing things, but with a new twist. I think if he hinted any harder that Rey’s parents were super cool, his ability to wink would have been permanently damaged. Everyone was aflutter with theories. Could she be the daughter of Luke? The for-some-reason-abandoned-and-not remembered daughter of Leia and Han? The daughter or granddaughter of Obi Wan? JJ Abrams set it up for some kind of cool, nostalgic twist. And then Johnson went naaaah, screw that noise. Do you know how happy I was to find out that Rey’s parents were nobodies? So, so happy. So happy. And to be fair to Johnson, he only killed the narrative tropes of most of the other films, not all of them. Do you remember how cool it was when Luke was this nobody from Tatooine? This guy who just managed to use the Force because he turned out to be pretty good at it, but Obi Wan also made it clear the Force was all around us, and pretty much anyone could use it? That started to be undone by the whole “I conveniently ran into my twin sister and the bad guy is my dad,” but we still had that first film, and we still had the idea that these narrative conveniences were the particular movements of the Force. But then we got the prequels. And we found out about midi-goddamn-chlorians. Hey kids! Forget all those ideas about how anyone could use the Force, and anyone could be special! Force sensitivity is determined by weird shit in your blood, and there is nothing you can do to determine your own fate. It’s like a space wizard eugenics program. And then we spend a lot of time, like a lot of time, figuring out how the personal drama of one family and their friends screwed over or saved the entire galaxy. Multiple times. I was made so amazingly weary by the idea that one family would basically control the fate of the universe for a third generation. It would be like if the Bush family controlled the galaxy instead of the country, and twenty years from now some long lost stepdaughter twice removed took over. But it seems like this film, and to a certain extent the previous film, are returning us to the egalitarian idea of the Force. Anyone can be a Jedi again! Finn can use a lightsaber, Rey is super powerful with absolutely no wonky, convenient genetics in her background explaining why, and even the little stable boy can use the Force. I love this.

And I think the message extends further, both in the narrative and outside of it. There were and are some really cool things in the Expanded Universe canon that got binned when Disney took over the Star Wars universe. And fans have a legitimate reason to be upset about those losses. But I think fans also have some rose colored glasses about the EU. Coincidentally, as I started writing this piece, Cracked did an article on some of the weirdest things to happen in the EU. In the EU, Greedo’s body is turned into a cocktail (not kidding) Wampas are sentient and the one that Luke maimed unites the Wampa tribes (still not kidding) and the monster in the trash compactor of the Death Star is named Omi and was enslaved to make the trash system work better, is possibly Force sensitive, and was trying to “baptize” Luke instead of eat him (cannot get across how little I am kidding). Pretty ridiculous stuff happens in even the more respectable versions of the Expanded Universe. Darth Maul is rescued by his brother Savage Opress (still refusing to be kidding) but his lower half is definitely a goner, so he’s given first a metal spider body, and then these metal… raptor… legs? And then eventually more normal legs. So. Yeah. I may be struck by Force lightning for this, but I’m willing to go out on a limb and say that it isn’t a bad thing for the universe to be given a clean slate.

Star Wars is learning a lesson from the comic universe—it is occasionally necessary to hit the retcon button. Star Wars is 50 years old, and instead of pressing the restart button at any point, it just delved deeper and deeper into its own mythos, to the point that we are getting stories about the bartender in the cantina and the WAMPA. Marvel and DC have gone through at least ten restarts and reimaginings apiece in that time, and while not all of them were winners, they were interesting, and they were necessary to help characters stay fresh and relevant. I will always love the old Star Wars, in the same way that I love older stories from DC and Marvel. But like comics, its necessary for Star Wars to let go of a lot of its past in order to fit in with what needs to happen these days—like, acknowledging that women and people of color exist. Hell, maybe if we’re really, really lucky, we’ll acknowledge some LGBTQ or xenophilic characters! Maybe if we wish really hard, Lando’s pansexuality can be acknowledged! Someone could bone an alien. Or whatever. But again, in order for Star Wars to become what it needs to be in the modern era, it has to kill some of its past.

 

Part 6: The Defense

So in this part, I’m going to do my best to address what I see as some of the biggest criticisms I hear from others about this film and try to mount some kind of defense. So we’ll see how that goes.

Critique 1: Luke is a Wuss/Luke Isn’t Cool Enough/You Murdered Luke and Thus my Childhood

So this is the big one. The doozy. The one that everyone, even my boyfriend, is upset about. They say that Luke is not nearly heroic enough. That he would never turn his back on Leia and the Resistance this way, that he would never close himself off from the Force like that, that he would never disavow the Jedi, that he would never just send his spirit self to pick a fight. And again, to a certain extent, I can understand. If you’ve had a heroic, blurry version of Luke Skywalker in your head for the last thirty years, and all the extra stuff he gets to do in the EU rattling around in your brain, this Luke could seem off. To which I reply… Look at the fucking text.

Luke in the films has a proven history of being heroic, then running away, then being heroic, then running away. It’s kinda his schtick. And it makes sense! He is a pretty normal farm boy whose masculine version of a Disney “I wish” song gets him plopped in the middle of a galactic war. Dude is dealing with shit. And the fact that everyone decided to shoehorn characters from the original trilogy into the new trilogy means that he has all kinds of extra shit to deal with, in a way that has to be pretty traumatic. In my own estimate (handily backed up by this little timeline) it has only been 30 years between The Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. And in those thirty years, Luke became the hero of the galaxy for destroying the Empire, the First Order somehow went from pulling together the scraps of the Empire to having giant rallies and a system-killing weapon, Leia went from helping to reform the galaxy to having to run a side hustle as a Resistance because the main government has (again) decided to pretend that evil things aren’t happening, Luke briefly attempted to murder his teenage nephew and then had his teenage nephew kill or steal all of his students… Jesus. The guy had a bad few decades. It’s honestly a shame in a lot of ways to have these films come so quickly on the in-universe heels of the original trilogy, because any joy you get from the end of the Empire gets deflated pretty quickly. Yay, we saved the galaxy from the Space Nazis! … what are all those Space Nu-Nazis doing over there?

And the Nazi/Nu-Nazi comparison is one of the things that helps me understand Luke in this film. In a weird way, so does the election of Trump. To a smaller scale, I’ve experienced some of what Luke is experiencing. The Obama years sandwiched between Bush Jr. and Cheeto Satan are my own miniature version of the defeat of the Empire going to a too-brief sense of hope before feeling even worse than before. I’m asking a lot of questions that I feel like in-universe Luke is probably asking: WHY ARE WE DEALING WITH NAZIS AGAIN? Why isn’t the government doing anything? Why aren’t enough people doing something? Why the hell am I so tired? I have been dealing with my feelings for Trump for only two years, and I am goddamn exhausted. If I had a cool Irish island to disappear to, I probably would. And I don’t have nearly the troubles that Luke has. Luke isn’t just a hero—he is a hero who saved the day, at great personal sacrifice, only to watch as the world… proceeded to make the same mistakes that led him to have to save the world in the first place. That has to be discouraging, and exhausting. I can totally buy him retreating from the world. I can totally buy him feeling betrayed by the Force and cutting himself off from it. I can totally see him getting tired of the Jedi Order (who are basically 0 for 1000 for stopping the giant uprisings of evil that happen with alarming frequency). I can see him feeling exhausted and like he has to distance himself from Leia, who has the courage and energy to keep fighting the good fight and who probably makes Luke feel bad for not having the same energy. (This is totally not a statement about me. Nope.)

And to be honest, I think his ending is perfect. He does briefly reunite with his sister. He does get the badass fight. He does get to FACE DOWN AN ARMY WITH A LASER SWORD. How is that not cool enough? You can maybe quibble with the whole disappearing into the ether thing, but again, I think it fits. Luke is trying to find true balance. He’s trying to find a true neutral. He has just expended a lot of psychic energy projecting himself onto another planet. And after succeeding in his mission and saving the remaining Resistance members, he finds peace/nothingness, and he goes out of the film series like he came in, staring at the sun. (Plus, his ship has been sitting at the bottom of an OCEAN for a decade. I know the Force is powerful, but can it reverse-disintegrate wiring? Because I don’t think it can. He was not making it to that fight in person.)

Critique 2: Kylo Ren is Too Lame/Whiny/Moody/Not Cool

One of the reasons that a lot of people were eager to find out more about Snoke was because they were really disappointed in Kylo Ren as a villain. How could we go from Darth Vader, the giant, swaggering, booming icon of evil with the best theme song music ever to this tantrum-throwing, crying, pouting, irrationally angry man-child? To which I say… Welcome to the post-2016 world. And welcome to our new villains.

Again, the Trump era can give us some answers. Kylo Ren and Hux are alt-right edgelords. Hux, at least, seems to be a true believer, so he’s an actually committed Nu-Nazi. He’s a Richard Spencer type. He really does want the pure space races to take over the galaxy and make everyone wear snazzy Space Nazi uniforms. Kylo Ren isn’t even that. Kylo Ren is an incel with anger issues. Kylo Ren is Elliot Rodgers. He is a young man who had some genuinely difficult things happen to him, but was still incredibly privileged. And despite that, he felt that he was entitled to many more things, and gets super pissed and violent when things don’t go his way. He’s a school shooter. He’s a domestic abuser. He is every mundane-yet-dangerous bundle of toxic masculinity that we are currently dealing with. Putin aside, we have very few modern villains in the mold of Darth Vader. Our villains are a lot more complex, and a lot more pathetic, than that. And Kylo Ren is the poster child for them. And like our modern villains, he didn’t have to end up this way. As Rey shows, he could make other choices. And it is tempting to try and do as Rey does, and redeem the villains and bring them back to the good side. But our modern villains, like Kylo Ren, continue to deliberately make the worse and more violent choice because the mental and emotional work of redemption is hard. And at a certain point, Luke realizes that they have to stop him, not write a sympathetic think piece about him. And even though he is pathetic, and broody, and pouting, and impulsive, he is still incredibly dangerous. Kylo is the villain that our current era both needs and deserves.

Critique 3: Okay We Hear You, But We Still Don’t Like the Representation

Okay. You’re entitled to your feelings. But also: welcome to the club. If you are a female geek, a geek of color, or a queer geek, you have been disappointed with representation in almost all the media you love forever. If I didn’t watch things where I was disappointed with some of the representation, I would no longer be able to watch things. There are properties where the representation is so bad that I refuse to engage with it at all, but I’m frequently disappointed in at least some representation in properties I like.

For example, one of my favorite Batman villains is Poison Ivy. She’s brilliant, she’s dangerous, and she’s an activist. While she is often fairly sexualized, it is usually not to the point that I find it super objectionable. This is how they decided to portray her in the Arkham series of video games:

Disney was falling all over itself to congratulate itself on including the first queer character in a live-action Disney film for the live-action Beauty and the Beast. The “queer” character is LeFou (literally meaning “the fool), and he gets about… three seconds of being even potentially queer. Are you ready for the big, daring moment of LGBTQ representation?

There, that was it. Us fans of LGBTQ representation sure must be satisfied after that absolutely incredible moment of romance.

This is Slipknot.

Slipknot is a character in Suicide Squad that is played by very excellent First Nations actor Adam Beach. He is the only member of the Suicide Squad who doesn’t get a full introduction. Guess how long Slipknot survives the movie? (Spoiler: It’s like, two minutes.)

You get the gist. Anyone who is not a white male has had to overcome a lot of disappointment regarding character representation. I’m not saying that we should start making white, straight, male characters as horribly as many female/queer/non-white characters have been made (besides, that already happened, it is called Most Jason Statham Films) but I’m saying that the fans who are disappointed in the characterization of Luke and Kylo despite all my best arguments are getting the merest taste of what it feels like to interact with disappointing media.

Critique 4: Diversity is Bad

You’re wrong. Next?

Critique 5: HOLDO IS THE WORST

So as I discussed earlier, Holdo not telling Poe or anyone the plan is admittedly a stupid move motivated by narrative necessity. You are not going to get any pushback from me regarding the idea that she should have just told everyone the plan. Even doing so could have still led to the conflict they wanted; Poe could have still decided that his and Finn’s plan was better, or that it was better to stay and fight, or whatever. The whole “I have a secret” thing was unnecessary and pointless.

However. Holy shit. Holdo gets so much hatred that just thinking that plot arc is stupid is not enough to explain the motivations. Her deliberately femme-presenting look and the fact that she repeatedly verbally destroys Poe probably does.

I cannot overstate how much I love Holdo’s design in this film. Like Poe, I was originally surprised by it, but then I thought, “why?” They’re on a ship. She’s not seeing field combat. She can dress however she damn well pleases. Is she less good of an Admiral because she has purple hair, or is wearing a dress? Of course not. We’re just conditioned to associate military service with military garb, and she upends our expectations, and becomes a giant, glaring symbol of “Your Masculinity Is Not Needed Here.”

Poe is the fan-insert character of this movie, and he gets the bejesus slapped out of him by Holdo, fate, and one time Leia literally. That makes male fans mad. How dare these lady people tell Poe what to do? He is the big, cool, pilot guy! And it’s even more insulting because of how Holdo dresses. Not only is he being told off by a woman, he is being told off by a femme-presenting woman, which apparently adds insult to injury.

Holdo is a calm, brave, calculating leader. She puts up with a lot of bullshit and is able to dish it right back, all while barely raising an eyebrow, let alone her voice. The silly decision aside, Holdo is an ideal leader for the Resistance, and while I totally admire her bamf exit, I am really sad to see her leave the series.

Critique 6: ROSE IS THE EVEN MORE WORST

Okay, almost all of the people making this argument are fucking monsters. I am an intense fan about a lot of things, but as far as I know, I never took part in any bullying that led someone to leave Instagram, let alone contemplate suicide. One of the reasons that I think Rian Johnson is trying to teach the Star Wars fandom the error of its ways and to let go of the past is that large parts of the Star Wars fandom are incredibly toxic. This image started making the rounds in the last few months, and it is freaking heartbreaking.

I actually loved Jar Jar when I was a kid and before I learned what things like “CGI blackface” could be, and even when I did, I didn’t blame Ahmed Best for the character. I thought that Anakin Skywalker was Mary Sue-ish, but I never would have wanted Jake Lloyd to stop acting. And the fact that John Boyega, Daisy Ridley, and Kelly Tran all quit social media because of hatred borne of the fact that they are a person of color, a woman, or both respectively is honestly infuriating.

The character of Rose had a couple problems, but most of those problems were in the service of Finn’s storyline being better. Her biggest “sins” in the eyes of the edgelords are that she tells a man what to do, and she keeps said man from committing suicide. Quelle horreur. We are working in a universe, may I remind you, THAT HAS GODDAMN ALIENS IN IT. Literal aliens. We can be totally okay with a race of squid people, but an Asian woman with a speaking role tops our “suspension of disbelief” meter?

The irony, to me, is that the Star Wars fans who engage in this trolling behavior are actually emulating an aspect of Star Wars—just not any of the good ones. As the meme points out, these “fans” are replicating the Empire or the First Order. They are intolerant. They are bigoted. They are close-minded. And they are hateful. And the world of Star Wars would be better off without them.

 

Part 7: The Summation

There’s a reason that Russian bots chose the discourse around The Last Jedi as an opportunity to sow discord. My own boyfriend will probably never read all of this review—even thinking about this movie makes him angry. The opinions on this movie are polarizing, to say the least. But I think that this film is polarizing for the same reason that our current political climate is polarized: the old guard is afraid of losing power. White, heterosexual, male fans have been the top of the Star Wars food chain, (and most if not all nerd food chains) for decades. Media has been created for them, specifically, for the same amount of time. And it is frightening and disconcerting when that is no longer the case.

Could Rian Johnson have made the transition smoother? Probably. But he had no guarantee that he’d have anything more than this movie to work with (and he was right) so he took his chance. In the same way that Johnson had to deal with insertions from Abrams, future directors are going to have to deal with the monumental changes Johnson introduced as they make their films. It’s not going to be impossible to undo the good changes that Johnson made (Trump came after Obama, after all) but it is moving the films, and the discourse around them, in the right direction.

I’m sad that this movie is polarizing. I’m sad that my boyfriend doesn’t like it. I’m sad that I don’t really know how to bridge the gap with the fandom in general if I can’t even bridge the gap with my own partner. But I am happy with The Last Jedi. The last few years at Comic Con, I’ve seen multiple little girls running around as female characters from these films. I’ve seen pictures online of little kids dressed up as Finn, and Jyn Erso. Thandie Newton wore a dress to the Solo premier that payed homage to and pointed out the scarcity of black characters in Star Wars. Change is happening. Critiques are being heard. And for the first time, a new generation of non-white, non-male Star Wars fans get to see themselves represented in a faraway galaxy in a long ago time. And that is priceless to me.

 

Signed: Feminist Fury

Sexy Halloween Costumes IV: The Stockholming

Because at this time of year we witches scream. Not for fright, but in rage.

[cw: mention of sexual assault (in relation to a Handmaid’s Tale-eque costume)]

 

A lot has happened in the past two weeks. But if I let myself start writing about Kavanaugh, voter suppression, or Proud Boy assholes, I am going to start screaming and not stop. Luckily, I have a built-in excuse to not think about those things; my yearly Sexy Halloween Costume Roundup.

I have been writing round-ups of sexy Halloween costumes for four years now. That’s a lot of time spent poring over costume sites, evaluating their wares, categorizing them, and then  thinking of clever things to say about them besides “Sexy costume. Ha.” (It also means that there is about a solid month where my computer cookies mean that basically all of my ad suggestions are for sexy costumes.)

I first decided to get a head start on the costume post for this year back in mid-September. And I started wondering… had I spent too much time looking at sexy costumes? Because while there were certainly plenty of costumes that were objectionable (And we’re gonna talk a whole hell of a lot about racist costumes here in a minute) I found that a lot of them… weren’t bad. And I might even… like? Some of them? I was pretty sure I’d gotten Stockholm syndrome.

 

Don’t worry. The feeling passed. Exactly three days later.

 

But we’ll get to that. First, I think it’s useful for you to come along with me on my journey from hopeful “huh” to despairing “oh my fucking god.”

So first, the costumes that I actually liked. Or at least kind of liked. And because I love you all, you get slightly blurry screenshots instead of links.

Yandy actually did remarkably well with quite a few hero costumes this year.

There is the Avenging Assassin, which is definitely NOT Black Widow, which I think is actually pretty fabulous aside from how difficult it would be to sit in:

There’s also a similar costume for plus size ladies, that I frankly think looks way more comfy.

 

There is a fairly fun if particularly booberific gender-bent Aquaman costume known as Atlantis Queen:

 

There is a pretty damn fantastic General Okoye costume that only fails in that it doesn’t involve pants:

 

There is a pretty spot-on Scarlet Witch costume:

 

There is Toxic Treat, a Poison Ivy costume that, despite being sexified, still manages to give her more clothing than the entire Arkham series of games:

 

There’s a Hornet Honey that actually is a pretty good take on the original comic costume for the Wasp. (And also reminds me of Dr. Mrs. The Monarch):

 

There is a legitimately cute anthropomorphized version of Rocket Raccoon:

 

There’s a pretty good take on Wonder Woman’s Themiscyra outfit:

 

There were also a few interesting video game-based costumes, including this legit fun Assassin’s Creed outfit:

 

And a fairly accurate Lara Croft costume:

 

There’s a cute and kitschy sexy Sherlock Holmes:

 

A sparkly peacock showgirl outfit:

 

A “Jackie the Ripper” costume that would be a really good Steampunk outfit:

 

A couple of Barbie costumes that are only as sexualized as much as… you know…. Barbie is:

 

A Clueless Cher costume that is exactly what it says on the tin:

 

A Jessica Rabbit/Roger Rabbit set that is… actually kind of amazing. I think they actually do a really good job of gender bending the Roger Rabbit costume, and it’s sexy without being insane. And again, Jessica Rabbit is already pretty damn sexualized:

 

This is a genuinely great flapper costume:

 

I would totally wear this bizarre but weird space cadet costume:

 

One of a million pretty passable Wonderland-related costumes:

 

I know I should hate this costume, because there is no reason to have a Prickly Pear costume, but I love it. Look at it. LOOK AT IT. It is so adorable. Look at that hat! Look at that bag. This is amazing:

 

I will be honest, I would totally wear this Pokemon Go trainer costume. Probably with leggings, because damn, but I would wear it:

 

I should not like this costume. I know I should not like this costume. This “Silent One” costume is a sexualized, gender-bent Hannibal Lecter. And no matter what fanfiction tells me, that is not ok. But it comes with a brain clutch. A BRAIN CLUTCH. How can I hate a costume when it comes with a BRAIN CLUTCH?

 

So you can see why I was getting a little confused. Why were there so many good costumes? Was I still on Yandy’s website? What was going on here? Was I actually finally going crazy?

Luckily, there were some costumes that let me know I was exactly where I thought I was. Weird ass trends and half-assed costumes abounded.

For example, there were four deer costumes. Four. Deer. Costumes. All of them new. Someone looked at the world and said, “You know what we need? Multiple forms of sexy deer.”

 

There were no fewer than three Mary Poppins costumes, all of them imaginatively labeled “English Nanny”:

 

Cavewomen were also a new trend, with two generic cavewomen, and two sexualized Flinstones costumes, Bedrock Babe and Bedrock Baby, the latter of which is sexualizing a toddler. Just saying.

 

 

There were some lazy and bizarre news-based costumes, including a Sexy Mystery Op-Ed, and a sexy Newsflash:

     

 

There were a lot of religious costumes, either due to the new Conjuring movie about the scary nun or just…. straight up sacrilegiousness:

 

… I am pretty sure this is what happens when you try to make the Three Wolf Moon t-shirt sexy:

 

And then you have this…. brain breaking quartet. Obviously South Park Characters, they are known as Small Town Erika C, Small Town Kylee, Small Town Stanka (seriously? Stanka?) and Small Town McKenna. I just…. cannot:

 

 

There were two Wednesday Addams costumes, known as Mid-week Honey (cuz her name is Wednesday. Get it? Get it?) and Gothic Child. I mean, I guess if you want to make it super clear that you’re sexualizing children you can but… it’s a weird decision:

 

There is a “Slim Man” costume that seems fine, until you think too hard about what that poor person does when they need to use their hands:

 

And a… Playboy Bunny logo costume. Was the Playboy Bunny costume itself, which is basically synonymous with sex, not sexy enough? Did we need this, too? This is bad. This is worse. It is emphatically less sexy:

 

And then… No. Nononononononono. No.

Do not accept. This is horrendous. It’s lingerie plus a sleep mask. No.

 

So a lot of these were bad. Some of them were really, really bad. But it wasn’t heinous.

I was first looking at this on September 17th. Some of my examples were admittedly added later, because as I found out on September 20th, apparently Yandy hadn’t finished stocking their store for the year. I found this out, because on September 20th, I found out about… this:

 

This… this is the Brave Red Maiden costume. It is a Sexy Handmaid’s Tale costume. A SEXY. HANDMAID’S TALE. COSTUME. This is literally an Onion article come to life. (Or at least Onion-equivalent.) 

It’s also something that actually happens in the show, when June and Fred go to the club/brothel. I am not willing to subject myself to the emotional trauma of rewatching multiple episodes to find the scene, but I promise you there is at least one sex worker in the club who is dressed as a sexy handmaid.

To really explain why this is terrible, let’s relabel it. This is a Sexy Rape Survivor costume. There, I fixed it. And by fixed it I mean revealed how terrible it is. Handmaid’s are subjected to repeated, ritualized rape. And while I believe, to a certain extent, in the concept of embracing sexuality as empowering when you have been subjected to sexual abuse, that is a personal, case by case issue. Not for a company to decide on and sell at $64.95.

Following the outcry about this costume, Yandy did something I’ve never seen it do in the four years that I have been doing these roundups: they responded to the controversy, and took the costume down. It was the right decision. I was able to get angry and have my anger deflate within the same 24-hour period. But it also raised the question: Why in God’s name have they not only not removed other costumes, but continued making them?

 

So: the following is a selection of the worst offenders for new racist costumes at Yandy. Not all of the racist costumes, not even all the new racist costumes. Just the worst ones.

These costumes are named things like “Beautiful Native,” “Chop til You Drop,” “Chief’s Desire,” “Harem Nights,” and a name that I won’t repeat because it involves an actual goddamn slur. The only way that Yandy has improved over past years is that at least a fraction of the costumes are worn by actual women of color in the photos. But in every case, they are replicating racial stereotypes, making cultures into costumes, and again, using slurs.

We should be just as upset about these costumes as we were over the Handmaid costumes.

If you want to actually appreciate other cultures, there are places to start that actually benefit people from the culture you are appreciating. Try Beyond Buckskin for Native-owned online places to shop for clothing and accessories, and this list from Bauce for African clothing and accessories. But please, please don’t go there for Halloween costumes.

At this point it’s clear that we’re not going to stem the tide of sexy costumes. But if the sexy costume trend could involve less cultural appropriation and mocking of sexual assault survivors, that would be great.

Signed: Feminist Fury

***

Featured image of a jack-o-lantern light is by Flickr user Thomas and released under a CC-BY-SA 2.0 license.

Get Past Your Magikarp Phase, Or Internalized Misogyny and Pumpkin Spice Lattes

 

Author’s note: Apologies for the two week hiatus. Richard and I both had some Life Stuff happening. This week you are probably expecting me to talk about the Kavanaugh nomination, or Les Moonves, or that Jian Ghomeshi bullshit, or why Ralph Norman should be punched in the face, or the newest evidence of extensive molestation in the Catholic church, or that guy who kidnapped a woman and assaulted her and is getting no jail time, or the assholes who are blaming Ariana Grande for Mac Miller’s death, but literally all of those things make me so angry that I make a sound that I am pretty sure only my dog can hear. So in order to save my blood pressure and her ears, I’m turning my attention elsewhere this week. I’m calling my past self out and defending pumpkin spice lattes. So buckle up.

***

I’ve mentioned before that feminism is a process as much as it is an identity (or, you know, a noun). We are all the products of our culture and of our education, and there is always more learning and growing that a person can do. The feminist I am now is vastly different from the feminist I was even five years ago. (For one thing, I’m even angrier! I wouldn’t have thought that was possible five years ago.) If you’re a nerd like I am, it can be useful to look at the journey like you’re a Pokémon. You’re continually gaining experience, learning new skills, and even getting items to help you along the way. And while you’re on the journey, you feel like you’re pretty awesome at what you’re doing at all times. And then once you hit Celadon City (yes that’s a Pokémon Red reference, I’m old, shut up) you look back at yourself at think, “Holy shit what was wrong with me?” Because while you might be a rocking Gyrados now, you had a few really, really unfortunate Magikarp phases. For a lot of cis female feminists (including myself) that Magikarp phase is also known as “internalized misogyny.”

For basically as long as I can remember, I have found myself at odds with a lot of the dictates of traditional femininity. If I had to describe myself from basically age 6 to… now… I would probably use “smart, large, angry, and awkward.” I was the tallest person in my grade for most of my elementary education, and shot past the size for most of the “cute” clothes other girls were wearing at an early age. When other girls were having tea parties, I was wandering around forests, and learning how to fend off mountain lions in a way that skipped straight to the most disturbing possible option. Most of my friends were boys, and despite my best efforts, I never seemed to fit in well with girls. (The closest I got was when I was used as a bodyguard for the popular girls during our collective “boys have cooties” phase. It’s good to be needed?) While I still did a lot of the things that all the other girls were doing—playing with Barbies, listening to Spice Girls, hanging NSYNC posters on my wall—there seemed to be some kind of fundamental divide between me and other girls, one that I couldn’t bridge no matter how hard I tried.

So I stopped trying, and started hating instead. I entered a prolonged “not like other girls” phase. I decided to formulate my own identity, my own special status, and my own worth, by how different I was from other girls, and by how much I could disdain the girls who alternately bullied and mystified me.

I decided I abhorred the color pink. I closed my eyes whenever I passed the violently pink Victoria’s Secret store in the mall, forcing my mother to take my hand and lead me safely past it before I would deign to open my eyes. I bought long sleeved tees from the boys’ section because they were more “hardcore.” I convinced myself that I liked wrestling and South Park, because that’s what the boys liked. (I didn’t, and I didn’t at the time, though I like it a lot better now.) I wrote poems that mocked girls as airheads. I declared an absolutely unnecessary vendetta against Leonardo DiCaprio, simply because all of the girls in my class were swooning over him. (To be fair, I’m still way more sad when the poor people in steerage die than when Jack sinks unnecessarily into the ocean.) I idolized fictional characters like Daria from Daria, and Kat from 10 Things I Hate About You, fellow smart girls who disdained the “normal” girls and were odd and quirky (and somehow still ended up with the guy). I bragged about having mostly male friends, and talked about how much “drama” other girls were. I also bragged about how I didn’t wear makeup, and could get ready for school in five minutes flat. In short, I did everything I could to prove that I was “not like other girls,” because in my roiling mix of anger, jealousy, and frustration, I misidentified the source of my problem. (Again, to be fair, I hadn’t learned words like “patriarchy” when I was twelve.)

While the girls who confused and abused me were definitely part of the problem, they were the symptom, not the source. I wasn’t truly angry at girls. I was (in the words of one of my friends) angry about girls. I was angry about gender norms, and the patriarchy, and enforced, performative femininity. But it was way easier to hate and make fun of girls, and police the things they liked and didn’t like, than to understand that.

And I’m not the only one. In my piece about Ready Player One, I briefly discussed Lindsay Ellis’ video essay on Twilight, and the points she made about how we have extra disdain and hatred for the things that women (and especially teen girls) enjoy, and how it’s seen as a way for women and girls to gain respect to distance themselves from the “average” girl. I luckily eventually evolved. Or at least got more uh, EXP. I’ve tried to expunge phrases like “I don’t really ‘girl’ well” out of my vocabulary. I am a girl (actually, I am a motherfucking lady thank you very much) and therefore I “girl” just fine. I’ve started wearing dresses way more often. I’ve called a ceasefire on my war on the color pink. I wear bright red lipstick like a confident 18th-century harlot. I like to think I’ve gotten a lot better. But I still have slip-ups.

Which brings me to my second “Magikarp/Internalized misogyny” phase, and the one that I’m hopefully helping myself (and others!) overcome today: the discourse around the “basic bitch.” And of course, pumpkin spice lattes.

I don’t really remember how old I was when the phrase “basic bitch” began to enter the cultural consciousness, but it was probably a good deal after that when it entered my consciousness. I also don’t remember when pumpkin-spice lattes became so… hateable. But I remember leaning into the curve, hard, in my mid-twenties, long after I should have known better. College Humor has a video that pretty accurately sums up the “symptoms” of what was culturally known as “basic,” but in my own mind the phrase is inextricable from leggings-as-pants, Ugg boots, Pinterest, and the ultimate symbol, the pumpkin spice latte.

In my mid-twenties, I apparently hadn’t totally overcome my desire to make myself seem more special by putting down other women. I definitely described more than a few women as basic. And at the time, I didn’t mean it as a compliment. My only (weak) defense of it is that I associated “basic-ness” with a certain class and race consciousness, or rather unconsciousness. For me “basic” was pretty much inextricable from “Becky,” referring to upper-middle class white women who “didn’t see race” and would have kept drinking Starbucks even if the coffee beans were proven to be made from dried orphan tears. But that’s not what most people meant by “basic,” and it wasn’t even everything I meant by “basic.” Luckily, I went from “leaning in to the curve” to “super uncomfortable with the curve” pretty quickly. But it seems other people haven’t made the trip with me.

For whatever reason, I feel like the anti-pumpkin spice latte hate has gotten worse this year (prompting this article). It’s the middle of September, and I’ve already seen multiple articles and Facebook posts that are basically like, “Put down the pumpkin spice lattes and stop being happy about terrible things, IT ISN’T FALL YET YOU WHORES.” And we all just need to take a deep breath, calm down, and stop hating on things that are basic/hating on basic women who love pumpkin spice lattes.

Because if we are not intending it as a critique of willful ignorance (as in my former paltry defense) then we are expressing it as a critique of women. And not in the “women who don’t help other women” sense, but the “the thing you like is stupid because things girls like are stupid” sense. Because when we call someone or something basic, we are letting that word stand in for other words. “Bland,” maybe. “Inoffensive, but not my scene.” “Mainstream.” Most of all, “normal.” When we are calling someone or something basic, we are reliving our desperate desires to be seen as special, or set apart. For those of us who overcame our first Magikarp stage, we’re reliving our desire to be seen as “not like other girls.”

We’re hating things for no reason other than the fact that multiple women performing “traditional” femininity like them. Leggings are comfortable, and we’re basically a couple steps away from returning to the “legging and tunic” days, which would make my inner fantasy nerd happy. Uggs are also comfortable. Pinterest is shiny and addictive. And pumpkin spice lattes are not totally my thing, but they are no worse than any other seasonal thing Starbucks pops out. To steal a quote from another friend, “Liking Doctor Who and craft beer does not make me inherently better than another girl who likes This is Us and pumpkin spice lattes.” These are preferences, not the moral judgments that we frame them as. Ironically, College Humor recently released a new video doing basically what I am doing here, and defending things that are “basic.”

And the things “basic” girls get made fun of are all just as average, and just as popular, as a lot of the things that guys like, but never get called “basic” for. How stereotypical is it for a guy to like cars, or sports? Or beer? But we don’t look at a pack of men shouting at a stadium and sloshing Budweiser and go, “Ugh, oh my god. Look at those basic bitches.” Because again, we’re unfairly angry about things that girls like, and we internalize a loooooot of misogyny.

So learn from my example. Make your Magikarp phases as short as possible. And for fuck’s sake, stop making fun of/using the phrase “basic bitches.”

Signed: Feminist Fury.

***

Featured Image of two packets of Dunkin’ Donuts Pumpkin Spice coffee is by Mike Mozart and released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licence.

The Venn Diagram of Victims and Victimizers

Because there IS overlap and we need to learn to admit it.

 

[cw: discussion of sexual assault]

 

***

 

American culture is weird in that (a) we are often able to believe in (and even weirdly appreciate) the often-cyclical, “pay it forward” model of violence and the dual nature people can hold as victim and victimizer, and also that (b) sometimes we’re really, really not.

Robin Hood’s basic shtick is that things were taken from him (either in the form of his lands and title being stolen or just really oppressive taxes, depending on the version of the tale you’re looking at) so he takes things from other people who are better off. A good portion of hero origin stories consist of “Bad shit happened to me so now I do bad shit to other people in the name of justice and/or revenge,” most notably “darker” heroes like Batman or the Punisher. Hell, even our government-sanctioned death penalty is somewhat based on this model—we kill people who kill people to show them that killing people is wrong (think about that…I’ll wait.)

But when it comes to sexual assault, we suddenly get a mental record-scratch. We cannot believe that the same person is both victim and victimizer. And this disbelief can take one of two forms; either “they are a survivor of sexual assault, so there is no way that they could sexually assault someone else,” or “they committed sexual assault, so there’s no way that they could be telling the truth about their own assault.”

I’ve seen both versions of this narrative swirl around Asia Argento. Argento is an actress, #MeToo activist, survivor of sexual assault from Harvey Weinstein, and girlfriend of the late Anthony Bourdain. She is also (Richard always makes me put “allegedly” here so we don’t get sued) a perpetrator of sexual assault. And this combination of identities does not seem to suit…well basically anyone.

Argento has been one of the more vocal members of the most recent iteration of the #MeToo movement. It was recently revealed that Argento paid a $380,000 settlement to Jimmy Bennett, an actor that she (allegedly) assaulted when he was barely seventeen. (She also played his mom in a movie and has known Bennett since he was seven, so there are alllllll kinds of layers of “fucked up” in this story.) And these two features combined seemed to break the internet’s cognitive dissonance meter.

I’m not linking to articles or comments, because they are often vile, but I’ve read them so you don’t have to, and things fall basically into two camps:

On the one hand, you have people firmly disbelieving that Argento could have assaulted Bennett, for a variety of reasons. Some are clinging to outdated, sexist notions that women cannot be perpetrators of sexual assault. Some are saying that because Argento herself is a survivor, there is no way that she could have been a perpetrator as well. Some are calling it an attempt to discredit the #MeToo movement. Argento herself claims that Bennett is both emotionally damaged and financially destitute, and is simply trying to extort money from her based on his knowledge of her partner Bourdain’s perceived wealth and her prominence in the Weinstein case.

On the other hand, you have the people who say that this is proof that Argento herself was never sexually assaulted, and that the #MeToo movement is also bullshit by extension. Because how could someone who has experienced sexual assault also commit sexual assault?

The answer is, the same way everyone else does: by seeking power and control. There are a lot of reasons why it may be harder for people to believe that a sexual assault survivor could become a sexual assault perpetrator than it is to believe that someone who has been robbed could become a thief, or someone who has been hurt could beat up someone else. My personal theory is that this inability to suspend disbelief comes from a couple of sources. The first is that we consider sexual assault to be something so intimate, and so personal, that it affects the victim and the victim’s spirit in a way that is different from all other crimes. We find it nearly impossible to believe that someone who has experienced a violation on that level could go on to violate someone else. I also think it comes from the fact that the majority of sexual assault survivors are women. No matter how many “Wives with Knives” shows get trotted out on the ID channel, we still have a concept of women as gentler and more forgiving than their male counterparts. It is harder for us to imagine them perpetrating on someone else. (This also feeds into our general difficulty imagining women being perpetrators of sexual assault, period.)

But while experts disagree on if there is a causative or correlative relationship between being a victim of various types of abuse and becoming a victimizer of that type of abuse (and if so, to what extent), the Venn diagram of “victims” and “victimizers” definitely has some overlap. Just because we don’t have as many movies about women being sexually assaulted and then going on a revenge spree where she sexually assaults others doesn’t mean that someone who has experienced sexual assault can’t perpetrate it against someone else.

So while we’re at it, let’s correct some of the misconceptions present in the discourse currently surrounding Argento.

  1. Asia Argento can’t have sexually assaulted anyone because she was assaulted herself.

….nope. See above.

  1. If Asia Argento sexually assaulted someone, that means she’s lying about being sexually assaulted herself.

Do I find it deeply disappointing, not to mention hypocritical, that a sexual assault survivor who is asking for her own experiences to be recognized and believed is belittling and gaslighting another survivor of sexual assault? Of course I do. Do I think that this means that Argento herself was not assaulted? Abso-fucking-lutely not. For the five millionth time, sexual assault is about power and control. You can be someone who has had power and control taken from them, and then take power and control from someone else. One doesn’t preclude the other.

  1. Argento’s assault of Bennett discredits the #MeToo movement.

Again, no. As Princess Weekes points out, the fact that Argento is facing scrutiny for her actions is actually a sign of the #MeToo movement’s strength. The movement is about believing and supporting all survivors. But supporting Argento as she works through the aftermath of her assault does not have to mean forgiving her for the assault she committed.

  1. The #MeToo movement is only about/should only be about women.

While the majority of sexual assault survivors are women, and the majority of sexual assault survivors who have spoken up in the #MeToo movement are women, that does not make them the only survivors or the only voice in the movement. Men and nonbinary individuals are also sexual assault survivors, and men in particular are likely to under-report their experiences. Terry Crews and Brendan Fraser have both come forward with their own experiences of sexual assault and harassment, and Crews in particular has become a major voice in the #MeToo movement, discussing toxic masculinity, gender norms, the interplay of power regarding race and gender, and sexual assault myths about “fighting back.”

It’s always going to be tricky and complicated when a survivor of sexual assault commits sexual assault against someone else. Both deserve support as survivors, and both should be believed regarding their experiences. I’m not going to pretend that I’m an expert at simultaneously supporting and condemning a survivor who is also a perpetrator. But just because it is complicated doesn’t mean that it should be dismissed, or that it doesn’t happen. And if we’re going to move forward as a society, we have to learn how to address these instances as well.

Signed: Feminist Fury.

***

Featured image is of a Venn diagram of A and B and the overlap A+B.

Mollie Tibbetts, Immigration, and Male Violence

Or, “why are you only concerned about male violence when it’s done by an immigrant?”

 

[cw: sexual assault]

 

***

When sexual assault advocates talk about ending sexual violence, they draw a distinction between “risk reduction” and actual prevention.

“Risk reduction” consists of the common “wisdom” about sexual assault (aka the things all of our moms told us before we left for college): keep an eye on your drink at the bar, carry your keys in your fist when you walk to your car, take self-defense courses, don’t get too drunk, use the buddy system, etc.

But if the only way that we’re working to end sexual violence is through risk reduction, we’re doing two things: putting the weight to “avoid” sexual assault on the victims of assault, and saying, “Don’t get raped—make sure he rapes another girl.” Because sexual assault is about power and control, not sexual attraction, it isn’t “foiled” because a rapist’s chosen victim is on her guard—there will always be another woman at the bar who is drunker than you, who isn’t paying attention to her drink, or who isn’t here with a friend. And that’s not just at your bar. It’s at every bar. Because men who desire power and control are at every bar.

Which brings us to undocumented immigration. (No, seriously.)

By now you have probably heard about Mollie Tibbetts, the missing Iowa woman whose body was eventually found. Her alleged killer, an undocumented immigrant Christhian Bahena Rivera, approached Tibbetts while she was running. According to one narrative that I read, he claimed he ran “with or behind” her for a while. At one point, Tibbetts grabbed her phone and told Rivera that he needed to leave her alone or she would call the police, then ran away from him. Rivera chased her, then according to his statement “blacked out.” In another, Rivera followed Tibbetts in his car and then pursued her when she ran away from him, eventually abducting her. (It is also important to note that Rivera has disputed his own status as an undocumented immigrant, while his employer claims that Rivera used false identification.)

Of course Trump, who started his campaign by calling Mexicans rapists and murderers, had a field day with this news. He and many other Republicans started blaming Tibbetts’ death on poor immigration laws, saying that it was poor border security that led to her death. To the credit of her family, they have been very strongly pushing back on this narrative. But of course, the same people who happily ignored the murder of Nia Wilson were not about to pass up the opportunity to insist on the (statistically disproven) narrative of immigrants being more violent than US citizens. Trump proclaimed at a rally, “You heard about today with the illegal alien coming in very sadly from Mexico,” he said. “And you saw what happened to that incredible beautiful young woman…Should have never happened. Illegally in our country… We’ve had a huge impact, but the laws are so bad, the immigration laws are such a disgrace. We’re getting it changed but we have to get more Republicans.”

Setting aside for the moment that human beings can’t be illegal, let’s focus on one section of that speech: “illegally in our country.” Because even if the Republicans get what they want and border security is tightened, it is risk reduction, not true prevention. We aren’t saying, “We should have done something so that Rivera did not hurt any women.” We’re saying, “Something should have been done so that Rivera could not hurt any women in the USA.” We’re saying, “Make sure he hurts a different girl.” If Rivera did it (and it seems likely at this point that he did), he didn’t hurt Tibbetts because he is an undocumented immigrant.

He hurt her because of toxic masculinity.

This is a simple narrative that we’ve seen again and again. A man approaches a woman who gives him no indication that she wanted his company. A man pursues the woman. When the woman rejects him, he gets angry and hurts or kills her. This happens literally every day in the US, and in most if not all other countries. Not because there are hidden pockets of angry, violent immigrants in each country. But because there are both hidden and visible pockets of angry, violent men in each country. Taking Rivera’s immigration status out of the equation, and we still have a story of toxic masculinity and a man attempting to assert power and control over a woman.

Now I admittedly can’t say with 100% certainty that Mollie Tibbetts still would have been hurt or killed if Rivera had not been able to make it into this country. And I truly mourn her death, and sympathize with her family and loved ones. But I can say with near 100% certainty that men like Rivera hurt women every day, even if they aren’t in this country. They just hurt them in a different country, and Trump and his cronies don’t give a fuck.

Signed: Feminist Fury.

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Featured image is of white crosses on the Mexican side of a large steel border wall. It was taken by Jonathan McIntosh and released under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 License.

Ellements of Film: Gallowwalkers is a Thing That I Saw

“Ellements of Film” is back! With… Gallowwalkers? Wait, why did we

 

[cw: mention of film depiction of sexual assault]

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I have notes sitting in various notebooks for long, in-depth posts on various movies that I have watched, enjoyed, and been affected by over the last year. Most of these movie posts have been sitting in my brain long enough that the movies themselves have come out on video. Or even Netflix. I have tons of thoughts on the way that women are depicted in them, the ways that the fan community has reacted to them *cough* Star Wars *cough* and even the way that they have reacted to sociopolitical trends. This post is about none of those movies.

There is a spectrum of bad movies. On the far end, there are “movies I refuse to watch.” These are movies that seem to have little to no redeeming qualities to them. For me, this category mostly consists of “torture porn” movies that seem to get more out of showcasing violence and rape than they do things like “story.” This is where Hostel and Human Centipede live. Then there are “bad movies.” Bad, pure and simple, with little to redeem them, and even drinking games feeling like a sort of penance. For me, these are movies like Catwoman and Descendants. Then you have “so bad they’re good” movies, where somehow the horribleness of the movie comes back around and makes it fun. These are the movies it is fun to MST3K with a group of friends, like The Happening or Plan 9 From Outer Space. Then you have “good despite being bad” movies. These are the movies that just soldier on, despite not having a lot to recommend them. Or they have some aspect that should discount them, but they manage to overcome it. This is the category for Demolition Man and White Chicks. Then you have “guilty pleasure” bad movies. These are movies that I acknowledge are not great, but that I will watch all the way through whenever they come up on cable, or that will make me coo, “Oh I love that movie!” when someone brings it up. You can pry Spice World and The Faculty out of my cold, dead hands. Zig-a-zig ah.

But there’s another category that is mobile, and whose contents can fall anywhere along the spectrum. These are what I call the “What happened?” movies. The movies that seemed to have almost everything going for them, but failed despite that. Or the movies that had almost all of the right elements, but then some key component failed. This is the category for Wild Wild West and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. This is also the category for about half of Paul Bettany’s career. Legion and Priest should have been amazing and definitely weren’t. Wild Wild West, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Legion, and Priest actually have a lot in common as “what happened?” movies. They have interesting worldbuilding, fun visuals, (mostly) good casts, and the outlines of an interesting plot. They fail in different ways, however, and these failures put them on different parts of the spectrum. For me, Wild Wild West falls into the guilty pleasure category. I know it’s bad. I know that Will Smith and Kevin Kline have the on-screen chemistry of baking soda and more baking soda. Now that I’ve passed my 20s and have read a lot of intersectional theory, I know that the whole “ableism versus racism” scene between Smith and Kenneth Branagh is hella problematic. But god damnit I will watch steampunk spiders and Crazy Southern Kenneth Branagh every time it is on TNT. League of Extraordinary Gentlemen falls into “so bad it’s good.” It really, really wants to be a mix of Oceans 11, Victorian novels, and the Justice League. It fails so hard. But it fails endearingly. I will drink beer and say mocking things about Dorian Gray any time. Legion and Priest are actually probably also in that category, though Legion edges towards “just bad.” Mostly because I am sick to death of the whole “magical baby will save the world” trope.

Which brings us to Gallowwalkers. A mixture of boredom, Netflix, and an idle curiosity regarding what Wesley Snipes has been doing since he got out of prison had me pulling this gem up late one evening. And it is a “what happened?” movie on a scale I previously didn’t think was possible. I don’t even know if I can categorize it. And I’m pretty sure the English language does not contain the proper words and syntax to give the movie a synopsis.

The imdb blurb says, “A cursed gunman (Snipes) whose victims come back from the dead recruits a young warrior to help in the fight against a gang of zombies.” But oh, it is so much more than that. So much. I am going to list some plot lines, any one or two of which would have been a perfectly good movie. I’m not going to worry about spoilers, because no one besides me should go into this movie not knowing what they are in for. Please keep in mind that ALL of these plotlines are in the movie.

  • Wesley Snipes plays an Old West version of Blade, as a semi-immortal monster hunter. There is no point at which it is not super clear that the main character is Wesley Snipes/Blade.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade is the child of a Satanist priestess who makes a deal with the devil and revives Snipes after death, but at the cost of also reviving his enemies.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade seeks revenge on the people who raped and robbed his would-be wife and struggles to live with the mixture of duty and hatred he feels towards the child she had as a result. She died in childbirth, because of course she did.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade saves a young man from some bad guys and then trains him to be a monster hunter to help him defeat his enemies.

(Side note: New Guy is played by someone who I recognized as “Dean Talon” from the Disney movie Motocrossed because I am a young woman who grew up in the 90s and early aughts. I possibly missed some attempts at plot while I imdb’d what he’d been up to since the early 2000s. The answer is “not much.”)

  • Wesley Snipes/Blade paints his body in random war paint to go after the people who raped his would-be wife. There is no clear purpose behind this war paint, besides Looking Badass.
  • Vampire/zombie hybrids known as Gallowwalkers roam the west, having to frequently kill people and steal their skin, because the bright sun dries out their stolen flesh, revealing their weird muscly underbits. Some of them wear metal helmets or make do with lizard skin in order to avoid this. Those people are more interesting than about 90% of the other characters and get little screen time.
  • The head Gallowwalker seeks the home of the Satanist priestesses in order to find out why he and his crew were revived, but his son was not. He carries his son’s body on a weird cross thing, and frequently kidnaps women in anticipation of them needing to provide his son’s new skin.
  • There is a weird sect of Religious people who are primarily Albino or just very, very pale, and they are planning to hang sinners on the same day that the Gallowwalkers invade their town.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade’s training of the New Guy includes dropping him into a secret set of underground tunnels where he has trapped a random Gallowwalker that he just sics on the new guy to test his skills.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade’s would-be wife is the daughter of a badass lady butcher, who took Wesley Snipes/Blade in as a child and now looks after her grandson.
  • The girl the Gallowwalkers kidnapped happened to be acquaintances with the person Wesley Snipes/Blade gets to be his new trainee. She also might be a prostitute, because the only women in the Old West are prostitutes, women who die in childbirth, and one (1) badass butcher lady.
  • It is revealed that anyone Wesley Snipes/Blade kills becomes a Gallowwalker as well. The rules for actually killing a Gallowwalker are hand wavey.
  • Wesley Snipes/Blade, New Guy, Feral Child Snipes Abandoned, and Badass Butcher Lady have to protect their home from the Gallowwalkers in a 30 Days of Night/Home Alone hybrid scene.
  • Wesley Snipes tracks down the main Gallowwalker and they fight.

(Side note: At this point I’d given up paying attention/was kinda falling asleep, so I don’t remember much of the climax of the movie. I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing.)

Seriously. ALL of that happens. In 90 minutes. And through the use of flashbacks and bare exposition and basically everything they can do to make sure you are mightily confused. It’s like watching a car crash with someone projecting a Western over the top of the crash and a vampire movie over the bottom of the crash. You have no idea what is going on but there are lots of moving pictures and you’re certain that something bad but fascinating is happening.

I literally cannot place this movie on the spectrum of bad movies. It’s a “what happened” mixed with a “bad movie” mixed with a “guilty pleasure” mixed with a “so bad its good.” It is fifteen movies in one.  And some of them had promise! You would have had me at “Old West Blade.” There. Done. Do that. Or focus on the weird albino religious people, or the lizard head Gallowwalker. That town was fascinating. But everything together is just…. WTF.

Normally I’d have to say that you’d have to see it to believe it, but I’m not even sure that I would recommend that anyone else watch it. At least not sober.

Signed: Feminist Fury

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Featured image is a close-up of Wesley Snipes’s face and his gun as shown on the cover of the Gallowwalkers movie poster with the words “Ellements of Film” superimposed.

Wait, Do I Have Economic Privilege?

Economic privilege is not having to *think* so much.

 

Economic privilege is a funny thing, in that everyone wants to be rich, but no one wants to admit that they have economic privilege. If you tell someone who is lower-middle class up through to the 1% that they have economic privilege, they will find fifteen different ways to “prove” to you that they don’t. Usually this proof consists of what they can and cannot buy. And while purchasing power is certainly an aspect of economic privilege, it is not the most important sign. Economic privilege is about the ability to avoid thinking. It takes an intense amount of mental and emotional energy to be poor.

I know this because I recently joined (or rejoined, depending on your definition) the ranks of the economically privileged. (Caveat: I am aware that as a white woman who was able to attend graduate school, has never been evicted from my housing, and has consistent access to things like clean drinking water, I have likely always enjoyed a certain level of economic privilege. That being said, without going into the entire sordid tale of my poverty bona fides, let’s just say that I’m well-acquainted with the experience of having various utilities turned off, and of sacrificing my opportunities for economic security so that family members could avoid being evicted.) It was not until I recently began making enough money to put me in the realm of what I would call “economically comfortable” that I realized exactly how much of my daily processing power I was using in order to navigate my economic situation.

It started, as many things do, with my gas tank. Rather than a luxury, a car is basically a necessity in Wyoming. Our public transportation system blows, and our large square mileage means that basically everyone decided to build out instead of up. Our largest city, Cheyenne, has about 64,000 people and a halfhearted thing that might be called a bus route if you are feeling kindly towards it, and is actually two square miles larger than the island of Manhattan, home to 1.66 million people and a large supply of buses and subways. Even the poorest in Wyoming often require a car if they want to become anything other than the poorest. Which means that many, many people in Wyoming are exquisitely aware of the gas stations in their area.

For most of my adult life, I have kept an encyclopedic knowledge of the gas stations in my surrounding town. I know which ones are liable to be 2-10 cents per gallon more expensive than some of their counterparts. I know which ones regularly overcharge by as much as 15-30 cents per gallon more expensive because they are a “last chance” gas station before you hit nothing but hundreds of miles of prairie, or because they are rare commodities in mostly-residential areas. I know which ones appear to be more expensive, but are actually a better deal because they provide discounts associated with a grocery store rewards card. I know which gas stations update their prices the fastest when oil prices go up. In short, I have devoted incalculable amounts of mental energy to the tracking of gas stations and their prices over the past two decades.

There is, in fact, a gas station only a few blocks from my house. It’s one of those “residential area markup” gas stations, and is usually at least 3-8 cents per gallon more expensive than some of my other options in town. I normally refuse to use it for that reason, though there have been a few times that I have let my “tank almost empty” light shine for an alarming amount of time and I sulkily put half a gallon of gas from that station into my car because I’m not 100% sure that it’s going to make it to the next station. I was having one of those moments a couple of months ago, and was keeping an eagle eye on the counter to make sure I could stop it at half a gallon. While I did so, I contemplated the pain in the ass that it would be to finish up there, close up my tank, exit with a left turn onto a busy street, drive to the next gas station with lower prices, force the machine to acknowledge my card as real currency, start filling my tank again, exit with a left turn onto yet another busy street, and finally make my way to work. And then I had a thought that I’d never really had before. “I don’t have to do that.” I did some quick calculations. At the very most, I’d be saving $1.50 by leaving the gas station I was at and going to another one. In days past, that had meant the difference between putting gas in the tank and not doing so. It had meant the difference between making my budget for the month and not doing so. And now it could very easily be seen as a convenience fee. It was now suddenly within my power to decide that $1.50 was a convenience fee. I could just finish filling my tank, and think no more about it.

It was revolutionary. I stopped paying as much attention to gas prices. I’d glance at them as I drove by, but more to keep a sense of gas overall, and no longer to obsessively catalog each price. When I started running low, I would just go to the nearest station, without worrying about whether or not it was one of the cheaper ones. I stopped having to devote as much brain power to saving money.

The other signs started piling up. Not automatically reaching for the generic brand of everything. Not studiously poring over the “per ounce” cost of every product to decide which size of something was truly the better deal. Offering to pay for friends’ lunches more. Letting myself impulse buy things on Amazon. They were all fairly small acts, but they all had something in common: I didn’t have to think as much. Every financial transaction took much less of my brain power. Purchasing was reduced to “Want—should I?—yes—buy.” When before it was “Want—should I?—can I?—really?—are there better uses?—maybe… buy?” I wasn’t going crazy. I wasn’t being absolutely foolish with my money. But I was relaxing. I was thinking less.

But the moment I knew that I had “arrived” at economic privilege was when my dog got sick. I was told she’d need emergency surgery. I was told the likely eventual price range. I was told I’d need 80% of the lowest price up front. I flashed quickly to my bank account, to my credit cards, to what I was pretty sure I had in my wallet. And with barely a thought, I said yes.

It wasn’t until after I’d said yes that I even considered that it should take more thought. It was a sum of money with three zeroes. It should worry me to pay it. But I’d been told that her chances of surviving the surgery were good. I was told that her quality of life should return to normal. I knew I had the appropriate sum in my savings. I knew it would save my dog’s life. That was all the thinking I needed to do.

A year ago, that wouldn’t have been the case. I would have been with the 40% of Americans who couldn’t cover an unexpected expense of $400 without selling or borrowing something. I’d have been on the phone with every friend I could think of, begging for help and doing my best to patchwork together the amount I needed. I would have wasted valuable hours hunting down money—hours that could have significantly affected my dog’s chances of surviving the surgery. I’d have been thinking about all kinds of things—who to call, how much money to ask for, how I could get the money to where I was in order to pay the vet up front. I’d have been thinking about whether I could afford it even with help, if it would drain my account and leave me unable to return home, or to get through the next week, or until my next paycheck.

Or I would have been having even more terrible thoughts—I would have been thinking “Would it be kinder to euthanize my dog than to admit that I don’t have enough money to save her? Can I even afford the euthanasia drugs, or do I have to let her die slowly of ‘natural’ causes?”

I knew I had economic privilege because I didn’t have to think about the question, “Can I afford to keep my dog alive?”

A lot of economically privileged people act as if poor people are stupid. As if they don’t know that that they could save money if they buy in bulk, if they give up Starbucks, if they stop using payday loans, etc. That simply isn’t true. Poor people are some of the smartest motherfuckers I know. Poor people are thinking all the time. Poor people can tell who what grocery store has the cheapest produce, and what grocery store has the cheapest meat. Poor people can tell you when the stores start marking down clothing so they can make room for new stock. Poor people can tell you what cafes or coffee shops let you stay the longest to mooch their wifi while only buying a single plain coffee. Poor people can tell you when their bills are due, and how long the grace period is for each bill. Poor people can tell you which laundromat has the best quality of machines for the lowest price. Poor people can tell you exactly how much money they have in their bank account. I doubt Trump can even tell you exactly how much money he has paid to Cohen to hush up affairs.

To have economic privilege is to have freedom from thinking. You can use the nearest gas station without thinking about it. You can tip your server 25% instead of 20% just because the math is easier. You can buy the food that tastes better, or is better for you, or is just easier to put into your cart. You can keep yourself reasonably healthy. You can keep your animals alive. You can avoid thinking about every moment of every day.

Sure, even economically privileged people still have financial worries. Wages are down, healthcare costs are up. No one seems to have enough retirement savings, and Social Security isn’t going to exist by the time I’m old enough to retire. Health problems can crop up at any moment.

But poor people have all of those worries, and then everything else. Hell, it becomes a privilege to have enough spare brain power to worry about retirement. Being able to worry about the future means being certain you’re going to survive the present. And when you’re having to devote so much of your time, your energy, and your thoughts to day-to-day existence, that isn’t a certainty that is easy to have.

Signed: Feminist Fury

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Featured image is of spare change on a table, is by Flickr user frankieleon, and is used under a CC-BY 2.0 license.

This is America

One of the phrases that I am heartily sick of hearing (from my own side, no less) in response to the treatment of immigrants and refugees is “This isn’t America.” I understand the sentiment—the people who are saying it mean that what is happening is horrific, and doesn’t match with our stated position of Greatest Country in the World.* But it’s a statement that is brimming with so much privileged ignorance and naivete it almost makes my teeth hurt. Because for anyone who is paying attention, this is and this has been America. We are pretty high in the rankings for “Treating People as Subhuman and Putting Them into Camps and Boxes.” It’s kind of our MO. And I should know, because I’m from one of the states where we very famously put people into camps and boxes.

Wyoming is one of those states that pretty much only shows up in your history books when something bad is happening. We get a couple early shining moments with the whole “Equality State” thing (Though long-time readers know how much of a crock that is) and then it’s basically “Things that Show Up on Depressing History Timelines: The Greatest Hits.” The Teapot Dome Scandal. Native American Resettlement. “Buffalo Bill” Cody exploiting a mythologized west. The hanging of Tom Horn and the death of the “Wild West.” Matthew Shepard. Missile silos. Being the last holdout to change the drinking age to 21. Dick Fucking Cheney. (We also brought you J.C. Penney’s. I’m never sure if that’s a good or a bad thing.) And of course, Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

From 1942 to 1945, legal US citizens of Japanese descent were involuntarily held at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming. At its peak it held 10,000 people, which made it the third-biggest town in Wyoming at the time. (It wouldn’t be terribly far from third now.) Internees were torn from their jobs and careers and forced to do jobs in the camps for subpar wages, or were used as manual labor for nearby ranches. Children took classes indoctrinating them into the glories of the US, which I’m sure would have taken a bit better if they weren’t inside a fucking barbed-wire fence.  Many Wyoming residents worried that the prisoners were being “coddled” or treated too nicely. Prisoners who thought that they should maybe have their constitutional rights back before they were forced to fight in WWII were charged in a mass trial as draft dodgers. Because if something can’t be described as “Kafkaesque,” then where is the fun in that?

Most of the people at the camps came from the West Coast. When I was learning about Heart Mountain when I was younger, I wondered if those people, used to warm weather, thought that they were literally being sent to the coldest part of Hell.

If you’ve never been in a Wyoming winter, then count your blessings. It’s not just the snow, or the cold, or the bleakness, though all of those things are terrible. It is the wind. The wind in Wyoming is vicious to the point of malevolence. It will find any crack, any crevice, and use it as an entry point so effectively you’d swear your front door was wide open. It will whisk the oxygen out of your lungs and leave you gasping like you just stepped onto the surface of Mars. It will howl like a demon being tortured by a cat. It will reach speeds that are referred to as “hurricane force” in places that have water, but here are referred to as “Wednesday.” And it is relentless. The wind is hard enough to deal with when you had the shitty fortune to be born here or the dumb idea to move here. It’s bad enough when you have access to adequate building supplies, and blankets, and heating. When you have indoor kitchens and bathrooms. For the prisoners in the camps, with their tarpaper walls, shared mess halls, and outdoor latrines, surrounded by barbed wire and prairie… I can think of few ways we could better show our inhumanity than by picking Wyoming as the location for these particular boxes and this particular camp.

And now, our country is looking at a period that should be one of our greatest shames and saying, “Don’t you guys think it’s time for a reboot?”

You don’t need me to tell you that Trump’s blustering is just that. That there is very little chance that the children who have already been separated from their families are ever going to see their parents again. That the private adoption industry, heavily Christian and heavily invested in by the GOP, anti-abortion groups, and of course, the fucking DeVos family, is going to make out like a bandit from this cluster. That Trump’s executive order, while seemingly kind enough to stop separating families, actually makes many things infinitely worse, including allowing for indefinite detention. That if we spent a fraction of the money we are wasting on holding these people on revamping the immigration and asylum system or addressing the humanitarian crises that drive refugees here we could save money *and* stop committing human rights violations. You’re all smart people. You’re all reading what I’m reading.

But what people apparently do need me to tell them is, “This is America.” It shouldn’t be. It sucks that it is. But like apple pie, putting people into camps and depriving them of their rights is something that we borrowed from the Germans and put our own spin on before rebranding as ours.

We can’t make progress unless we are being honest with ourselves, and with our past. Acting as if this is something new and unusual masks how frequently the US has used this as a tactic in the past, and the many iterations and practice runs that we’ve had. This idea didn’t spring out of nowhere, and acting as if it has will make it all the easier to happen again. We don’t need more tragedies in state histories. We don’t need more innocent people at the mercy of the elements. And we don’t need pretty lies about what kind of country we have in order to work towards having the country we want.

Signed: Feminist Fury

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*Or at Least Greater Than a Lot of Other Countries, Fuck You, Swaziland, You Don’t Even Sound Like a Real Place.

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Featured Image of five children of Japanese descent holding their hands over their heart during the pledge of allegiance in 1942, by Dorothea Lange, CC0 Public Domain